Possesive'

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Arushin

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Apr 13, 2008
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I need some answers. I wrote a sentence:
The man's bicycles were stolen from him.
Someone told me the apostrophe goes after the s and depending on the way you say it, you may put another s after that.
I could use the rule. I am very confused right about now.
 

riverkid

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I need some answers. I wrote a sentence:
The man's bicycles were stolen from him.
Someone told me the apostrophe goes after the s and depending on the way you say it, you may put another s after that.
I could use the rule. I am very confused right about now.

'man' is singular denoting one man, Arushin, so your example is fine. If there were two or more men [plural], then you would put the apostrophe after the 's', as in,


The mens' bicycles were stolen from [him] them.
 

Arushin

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'man' is singular denoting one man, Arushin, so your example is fine. If there were two or more men [plural], then you would put the apostrophe after the 's', as in,


The mens' bicycles were stolen from [him] them.


Now, my English teacher told me that with words such as genius and making it possessive, you would write it as you say it.
For example, I would say genius's plate, but others may say genius' plate, or maybe I didn't understand it and he was talking about the plural forms or something else I didn't understand fully.
 

David L.

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If there were two or more men [plural], then you would put the apostrophe after the 's', as in,
The mens' bicycles were stolen from [him] them.

This is incorrect.

Here is the rule:
Determine who owns the object/s. Then the apostrophe comes straight after. So:
John owns the bike, so
It is John's bike. - John 's
The boys have bicycles. So
They are the boys' bicycles - boys '
The child owns the bike, so
It is the child's bike - child 's
The children have hats. So
They are the children's hats - children 's
the man has a bicycle, so
It is the man's bicycle - man 's
Men own their bicycles, so
They are the men's bicycles - men 's
 
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riverkid

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English Teacher
I wrote:
If there were two or more men [plural], then you would put the apostrophe after the 's', as in,
The mens' bicycles were stolen from [him] them.


This is incorrect.

David is right. It is indeed, incorrect. I was mistaken. Sorry for the inaccurate information, Arushin.
 
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