[General] poured water on it to rut it out

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vil

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Dear teachers,

Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my free interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

The livestock expert poured water on it to rut it out.

rut = recurring condition in male animals in the mating season

rut out = ? …..maybe “cool down”

Thank you for your efforts.

Regards,

V
 

birdeen's call

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Could you provide more context? We don't even know what the "it" is.
 
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vil

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Hi birdeen's call,

Here are a few additional words concerning my grounds to state my interpretation of the key phrase in my original post above.

rut = estrous

estrous = relating to or being in estrus

e. cycle = e. cycle — one of the two types of reproductive cycles, the other is the menstrual cycle of humans and primates. Regularly occurring periods during which the female is sexually active and receptive, estrus, separated by periods in which there is no sexual receptivity.

estrus = the periodic state of sexual excitement in the female of most mammals, excluding humans, that immediately precedes ovulation and during which the female is most receptive to mating; heat.

In my sentence zoo-technician damps the sexual excitement of a female animal by throwing water over it."It" may be an sheep or ewe, a cow, a bitch, or a female pigeon. ;-) Please, excuse my earthy language.

According to me, the sentence in question is an acceptable one.

I am in doubt only whether there is in English a verb as "rut out".

Regards,

V.
 
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Tullia

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Vil, when people ask for context they aren't criticising you, you don't have to explain your original thoughts and go on the defensive! Just tell people the context, and maybe they will be better able to help.


So, based on what you have said, this is a sentence you are trying to write, not one you have found somewhere?

In which case, no, "rut out" makes no real sense in English as a verb. Even if you *had* found it somewhere, I would still say that it was poor English and nigh-on unintelligible.

I would suggest something like:

The livestock expert poured water on it to counteract the effects of being in rut.

It's less pithy than your original, but isn't so open to misinterpretation.

Frankly, when seeing water being poured on something to rut it out, my first instinct was "it" was a fire and "rut" was a typo for "put". That should tell you how important context is, and if you offered it originally you would have got much more help, I suspect.
 
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