predicate

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Anonymous

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Hello

I have a question regarding the OED definition of the word "predicate"
It says:" The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula(which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix).

i don`t understand what is meant with the logical copula and the personal suffix. why is it expressed by this?

i would be very thankfull, if you could help me

best regards

fredo
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Hi,

A copula, (also called a linking verb), is a word that is used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate. It serves to associate the subject with a predicate that could not stand by itself. For example, in the sentence, "Bob runs"( 's' is personal suffix of the verb 'run' that agrees with a subject), the predicate 'run' is already a verb, so it can be used by itself. In the sentences "Bob is old", however, the predicate is an adjective, so the linking verb 'is' (a form of 'be') is necessary and serves to associate the adjective 'old' with Bob.

I hope it helps,
Iza


fredo733 said:
Hello

I have a question regarding the OED definition of the word "predicate"
It says:" The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula(which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix).

i don`t understand what is meant with the logical copula and the personal suffix. why is it expressed by this?

i would be very thankfull, if you could help me

best regards

fredo
 
F

fredo73

Guest
Thank you!
i understand what a copula and a suffix is, but i dont understand
why the definition says, that the copula is expressed by the personal suffix! That means that the copula is the suffix!
can you help me again?
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Hi,

From what I understand you know what a predicate is, right?

To be honest with you, I am not really sure why the definition is written the way it is. I understand that the personal suffix is the inflection of a copula or other verb needed to agree with its subject. However, this is not relevant to the definition of a predicate.

I'm sorry if it does not answer your question,
Iza





fredo73 said:
Thank you!
i understand what a copula and a suffix is, but i dont understand
why the definition says, that the copula is expressed by the personal suffix! That means that the copula is the suffix!
can you help me again?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
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Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Francois said:
Country simple -- Gotta add that to my vocabulary list :)

FRC

It's a great expression. Another I like is'in the old money' as a way of using a term that is no longer regarded as completely acceptable:

[Politically correct term], or [Politically incorrect term] 'in the old money'. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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fredo733 said:
Hello

I have a question regarding the OED definition of the word "predicate"
It says:" The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula(which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix).

i don`t understand what is meant with the logical copula and the personal suffix. why is it expressed by this?

i would be very thankfull, if you could help me

best regards

fredo

EX: She washes the car.

In grammar, the first word She is the subject, and washes the car is the predicate. The predicate is made up of the verb washes and its object the car.

Grammar: She washes the car. (Predicate)

In logic, every proposition is reducible to the form A is B, B being the predicate. That is, we insert a word between the subject and the predicate to get a better idea of what the predicate actually looks like, like this,

Logic: She is washing the car. (Predicate)

The logical form of She washes the car would be She is washing the car.

The logical copula (i.e. the word that connects or couples together the subject with the predicate) would be "is",

She is washing the car. (Copula)

With other verbs, though, the logical copula (i.e. the thing that connects the subject with the predicate) is not visible,

She (subject) washes the car. (Predicate)

Here we have A B; there's no A is B.

In a verb, such as washes, walks, goes, eats, the logical copula, or in other words, the thing that ties or bridges the subject with the predicate, is expressed by the personal suffix (i.e. by inflection),

She washes the car.

That is, the -es ending on washes agrees in number and person with the 3rd person singular subject She. Subject-Verb Agreement acts as the logical copula. :D

She washes the car. (Logical Copula)
She is washing the car. (Logical Copula)

When there isn't a copula (i.e. "is, am, are" etc.), inflection (i.e. -es) acts as the joining element.

All the best,
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Nicely explained. A+++

Casiopea said:
fredo733 said:
Hello

I have a question regarding the OED definition of the word "predicate"
It says:" The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula(which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix).

i don`t understand what is meant with the logical copula and the personal suffix. why is it expressed by this?

i would be very thankfull, if you could help me

best regards

fredo

EX: She washes the car.

In grammar, the first word She is the subject, and washes the car is the predicate. The predicate is made up of the verb washes and its object the car.

Grammar: She washes the car. (Predicate)

In logic, every proposition is reducible to the form A is B, B being the predicate. That is, we insert a word between the subject and the predicate to get a better idea of what the predicate actually looks like, like this,

Logic: She is washing the car. (Predicate)

The logical form of She washes the car would be She is washing the car.

The logical copula (i.e. the word that connects or couples together the subject with the predicate) would be "is",

She is washing the car. (Copula)

With other verbs, though, the logical copula (i.e. the thing that connects the subject with the predicate) is not visible,

She (subject) washes the car. (Predicate)

Here we have A B; there's no A is B.

In a verb, such as washes, walks, goes, eats, the logical copula, or in other words, the thing that ties or bridges the subject with the predicate, is expressed by the personal suffix (i.e. by inflection),

She washes the car.

That is, the -es ending on washes agrees in number and person with the 3rd person singular subject She. Subject-Verb Agreement acts as the logical copula. :D

She washes the car. (Logical Copula)
She is washing the car. (Logical Copula)

When there isn't a copula (i.e. "is, am, are" etc.), inflection (i.e. -es) acts as the joining element.

All the best,
 
F

fredo73

Guest
izabela said:
Nicely explained. A+++

Casiopea said:
fredo733 said:
Hello

I have a question regarding the OED definition of the word "predicate"
It says:" The statement made about a subject, including the logical copula(which in a verb is expressed by the personal suffix).

i don`t understand what is meant with the logical copula and the personal suffix. why is it expressed by this?

i would be very thankfull, if you could help me

best regards

fredo

EX: She washes the car.

In grammar, the first word She is the subject, and washes the car is the predicate. The predicate is made up of the verb washes and its object the car.

Grammar: She washes the car. (Predicate)

In logic, every proposition is reducible to the form A is B, B being the predicate. That is, we insert a word between the subject and the predicate to get a better idea of what the predicate actually looks like, like this,

Logic: She is washing the car. (Predicate)

The logical form of She washes the car would be She is washing the car.

The logical copula (i.e. the word that connects or couples together the subject with the predicate) would be "is",

She is washing the car. (Copula)

With other verbs, though, the logical copula (i.e. the thing that connects the subject with the predicate) is not visible,

She (subject) washes the car. (Predicate)

Here we have A B; there's no A is B.

In a verb, such as washes, walks, goes, eats, the logical copula, or in other words, the thing that ties or bridges the subject with the predicate, is expressed by the personal suffix (i.e. by inflection),

She washes the car.

That is, the -es ending on washes agrees in number and person with the 3rd person singular subject She. Subject-Verb Agreement acts as the logical copula. :D

She washes the car. (Logical Copula)
She is washing the car. (Logical Copula)

When there isn't a copula (i.e. "is, am, are" etc.), inflection (i.e. -es) acts as the joining element.

All the best,


Sounds logic! Thank you!

Now i understand it! Do you have some further
information about this topic? some grammarbooks
or internet sites?

greets
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
fredo73 said:
Sounds logical! Thank you!

Now I understand it! Do you have some further
information about this topic? some grammar books
or internet sites?

Greetings

You're welcome.

As for more info, it would help if you could tell me why you're looking at predication. :D I need to narrow down my search.
 
F

fredo73

Guest
Casiopea said:
fredo73 said:
Sounds logical! Thank you!

Now I understand it! Do you have some further
information about this topic? some grammar books
or internet sites?

Greetings

You're welcome.

As for more info, it would help if you could tell me why you're looking at predication. :D I need to narrow down my search.


Hello

One more question to the predicate and copula!

When in the sentence "she washes the car" the -es
connects the subject and the predicate, (and works
as the copula), how does it work in the past tense?

If i say " he washed his car" the -ed connects the
subject and the predicate, but what in a sentence like
"bob went home"?

i can`t see the copula in that sentence. or isn`t the
copula or linking element always necessary?

thanks
 
A

Andy

Guest
I've never found the concept of the predicate useful. The best way to define it is everything that isn't the subject.

If you want to understand sentence structure, subject, verb phrase, object/compliment, prepositional phrase, relative clause, compound and complex sentence structure covers everything.
 
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