Prepositions of time 3

I met him ___ a Monday.


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Tdol

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Da doo ron ron
 

RonBee

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We use at when referring to a specifc time. For example:

  • I met him at five o'clock.

Or:

  • I met him at five o'clock on a Monday.

(One down and sixteen to go. (Ron can't count.))

:wink:
 

RonBee

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o_cat said:
(One down and sixteen to go. (Ron can't count.))
What do this mean?

It's a joke (and bad one). Tdol listed seven different prepositions, and I commented on one of them. (Actually, two.) That left six, but I said there were sixteen to go. Obviously, I can't count. :wink:

Say: What does this mean?

:)
 

quantumphyser

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It's so hard to choose, tdol, you'r sure that's suitable for beginner?
 
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Huda-M

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The answer is ON monday.
 

rollerkoster

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i never heard of I met him on a Monday. but i heard I met him on Monday a lot. which is it true? with a or without a?
 

Akram-Mohamed

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First of all Hello, and thanks for this good fourm :):up:

My name is Akram, i'm a new member here.

................................................................

Related to your topic

i choose "On" as i knew that the preposition "On" come before days.

but when thinking a while "since" can be choosen also and the persentage of since is more than on in the presence of specified time " A Monday".

Am i right ??
 

Huda-M

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Yes, before days, I've always heard ON
 

the creative

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thanks very much
 

chadley25

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?????????????

"Da doo ron ron" is a reference to song lyrics from a popular American song of the same title from the 60s, I believe, performed by The Crystals and later covered by Shaun Cassidy. The lyrics in question go something like, "I met him on a Monday and my heart stood still... da doo ron ron ron, da doo ron ron." It's just a meaningless "filler lyric," much like "doo wah diddy" or something else. :)

And yes, the preposition "on" is used for dates or days (of the week).
 

chadley25

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First of all Hello, and thanks for this good fourm :):up:

My name is Akram, i'm a new member here.

................................................................

Related to your topic

i choose "On" as i knew that the preposition "On" come before days.

but when thinking a while "since" can be choosen also and the persentage of since is more than on in the presence of specified time " A Monday".

Am i right ??

Actually, with reference to this particular example, the word since would generally only be used in a negative sentence with a perfect-tense verb, such as "I haven't met him since Monday." (Also, in spoken American English, we would almost always say, "I haven't seen him since Monday," not met.)

As for your question, since (and its counterpart for) have different uses than prepositions of time (on, in, at). Since and for are typically (but not always) used with perfect tenses, such as present perfect and past perfect (as well as their continuous forms).

You are correct to think that the word since is used with a specific point in time (such as a day or date), while for is used with a period of time, such as "three days" or "a month." However, neither of these words are interchangeable with prepositions of time.
 

killerfish

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i never heard of I met him on a Monday. but i heard I met him on Monday a lot. which is it true? with a or without a?

without 'a' sound more right to me.
 
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