[Grammar] Present perfect or past simple

Ab.m

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why is present perfect used in the following examples :
" you've received a new message "
" you've successfully changed you password "
why not past simple ?😅
 

teechar

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Why is the present perfect instead of the past simple used in the following examples?
"You've received a new message."
"You've successfully changed you password."
[STRIKE] why not past simple ?[/STRIKE]
The present perfect indicates that the actions took place in the recent past. The past simple would not tell us when in the past those actions occurred.
 

Ab.m

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The present perfect indicates that the actions took place in the recent past. The past simple would not tell us when in the past those actions occurred.
But past simple aslo can be used in recent past, isn't it ?
 

Ab.m

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The situations have present relevance - a new message is waiting for you; your password is now not what it was before.

We have had quite a few questions recently about the present perfect indicating 'recent past'. The present relevance is more important in BrE than how short a time has passed since the event happened.


So present perfect used more often because most recent past actions defentliy will have a present relevance.
and on other hand if there is no present relevance so past simple is used
 

Ab.m

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So that's what I understand from all your replies, in BrE everything that just happened is usually expressed with present perfect and focus on the present relevance.
 

jutfrank

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If there is no past-time reference, such as just, a minute ago,then the present perfect is very likely in BrE. If there is such a past-time reference, however recent the past time was, we generally use a past tense.

just is often used with present perfect, too.
 

jutfrank

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The present perfect indicates that the actions took place in the recent past. The past simple would not tell us when in the past those actions occurred.

The present perfect in itself does not indicate the recent past (although possibly the situational context does) and it does not tell us when in the past the action occurred. I could theoretically check my phone after 100 years and still receive a similar notification. You've received 300,000 new messages.

These examples work well in the present perfect because they are notifications. Notifications, like news, have present relevance.
 

emsr2d2

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But the past simple ​can [STRIKE]aslo[/STRIKE] also [STRIKE]can[/STRIKE] be used in the recent past, [STRIKE]isn't[/STRIKE] can't it?

Note my corrections above.
 

Ab.m

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The present perfect in itself does not indicate the recent past (although possibly the situational context does) and it does not tell us when in the past the action occurred. I could theoretically check my phone after 100 years and still receive a similar notification. You've received 300,000 new messages.

These examples work well in the present perfect because they are notifications. Notifications, like news, have present relevance.
So it tells us that the past action has a relevance to the present or present results, whether the action just happened or happened long time ago
 

farhankhan2007

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" you've received a new message "
" you've successfully changed you password "

The action happened at an unspecified time in the past and the action is still true.

"You have recieved a new message" which says you received it an unspecified time but the state that you have the message now is still true when you read it and the time when you received is not important. Important is to notify about the message.
Simple past would be used for a completed action in the past wherein the state of would be you had the message at one point and you may not have it now.

"You have successfully changed your password" again this one says that the change in the password is still true at the time when you are reading this message of password change and simple past would be for an action completed in the past like you successfully changed the password yesterday.

In present perfect the actions happens in a moment of time that includes now. We can make the moment however long we want.

I apologise if I am wrong. I am not a native speaker either. Just trying to learn the language.
 
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