Problems with present subjunctive in third person

Status
Not open for further replies.

Bushwhacker

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Catalan
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
Please, may you correct subjunctive, if it is the case, and other things of the following sentences?

On the one hand, it is admirable his vitality and that he has (or have) achieved to make a film so aged. On the other, moviegoers remembering his filmography miss the quality of his best pictures.

One thing is that some of the cast names are (or be) attractive for cinema fans and another one that that corresponds (or correspond) to anticipation generated.

Only a violent death taking place in front of her makes she reacts (or react) fifty years in delay.
May it be said "in delay" as for something taking place fifty years after the moment it had to occur?

Place and time shifting do not prevent developed action be (or is) clear and understandable



Thanks a lot :-D:up:
 
Last edited:

gybbyr

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2008
Member Type
English Teacher
Please, may you correct subjunctive, if it is the case, and other things of the following sentences?

On the one hand, it is admirable his vitality and that he has (or have) achieved to make a film so aged. On the other, moviegoers remembering his filmography miss the quality of his best pictures.

One thing is that some of the cast names are (or be) attractive for cinema fans and another one that that corresponds (or correspond) to anticipation generated.

Only a violent death taking place in front of her makes she reacts (or react) fifty years in delay.
May it be said "in delay" as for something taking place fifty years after the moment it had to occur?

Place and time shifting do not prevent developed action be (or is) clear and understandable



Thanks a lot :-D:up:

It is has (ie, she has, he has, it has, and I have, you have, they have,etc)

Are is correct

"Fifty years after the event, she reacted to the violent death that had taken place in front of her".

Hope that helps.
 

Bushwhacker

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Catalan
Home Country
Spain
Current Location
Spain
It is has (ie, she has, he has, it has, and I have, you have, they have,etc)

Are is correct

"Fifty years after the event, she reacted to the violent death that had taken place in front of her".

Hope that helps.

Many thanks for your attention, but my problem is not as for distinguishing has from have, but with subjunctive. All these sentences have third person forms in subjunctive present, and my question is if the third person in subjunctive present keeps the form of the other persons or it uses the form of third person in indicative present. I think third one in subjunctive uses common form like the others and not the indicative one but I'd like confirmation and corroboration as for the correctness of the text.

What about "in delay"?

Thanks:-D:up:
 

riverkid

Key Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Please, may you correct subjunctive, if it is the case, and other things of the following sentences?



One thing is that some of the cast names are (or be) attractive for cinema fans and another one that that corresponds (or correspond) to anticipation generated.

On the one hand, it is admirable his vitality and that he has (or have) achieved to make a film so aged. On the other, moviegoers remembering his filmography miss the quality of his best pictures.

Only a violent death taking place in front of her makes [she] her reacts (or react) fifty years in delay.

May it be said "in delay" as for something taking place fifty years after the moment it had to occur?

Place and time shifting do not prevent developed action from being [be] (or [is]) clear and understandable.

Thanks a lot :-D:up:

Good day, Bushwhacker.

We don't use 'may' with 'you' for permission as you have done, above [underlined].

Can/Could/Will/Would you correct ... ?

May I ask you to correct ... ?


The subjunctive is almost dead in modern English and there are only a few forms left. These forms seem to be used with certain phrases.

I don't see any need for a subjunctive form in any of your examples, BW. Actually, I'm not at all sure that I can even see any possibility for a subjunctive.


Read this;


§ 61. subjunctive. 1. Grammar. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996

to see if you understand. If you have any questions after you read it, please feel free to come back here and ask.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top