promise to

Status
Not open for further replies.

*^^*

Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2010
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
1. "Under no circumstance, he would break the promise to pay back the money."
Does this sentence mean he will return the money or not?

I think maybe I change it like this would be easier to understand.
"Under no circumstance, he would break the promise of paying back the money."

2. "----When did you find your bag?----It may have been at Christmas when John gave me the book."

"----When did John give Mary the book?----It may have been Christmas when John gave me the book."
In order to understand the difference between these two answers, I created two questions to match the two different answers , am I right?
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
1. "Under no circumstance, he would break the promise to pay back the money."
Does this sentence mean he will return the money or not?

I think maybe I change it like this would be easier to understand.
"Under no circumstance, he would break the promise of paying back the money."

The sentence is incorrectly written. It should be "Under no circumstances would he break his promise to pay back the money." The correct word is "to".


2. "----When did you find your bag?----It might have been at Christmas, when John gave me the book."
This is correct, but if you omitted "at", it would still be understood. Note that I have added a comma after "Christmas" so that it means "I might have found my bag at Christmas, at the same time that John gave me the book". The suggestion is that I can't exactly remember when I found my bag.

"----When did John give Mary the book?----It might have been Christmas when John gave me the book."
This is correct without "at".

In order to understand the difference between these two answers, I created two questions to match the two different answers , am I right?

See my answers above in red.
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
1. "Under no circumstance, [STRIKE]he[/STRIKE] would he break the promise to pay back the money."
Does this sentence mean he will return the money or not?

He would not break his promise. He would return the money.

I think maybe I change it like this would be easier to understand.
"Under no circumstance, [STRIKE]he[/STRIKE] he would break the promise of paying back the money."

No
No comma is required. We invert subject and verb when a sentence begins with a negative construction.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top