pronunciation

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james_chew_84

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I've listen to these pronunciation many times and I just want to know whether they sound the same. they sound the same to me! Are they?

Is the pronunciation of You is as same as you've?
Is the pronunciation of I is as same as I've?
 

Tdol

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It depends; in the UK, some save 'I done' (regional and regarded as an error traditionally), but others will say I've (it's there, but very small). In these cases, it may well be hard to hear it. :roll:
 

Casiopea

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james_chew_84 said:
I've listen to these pronunciation many times and I just want to know whether they sound the same. they sound the same to me! Are they?

Is the pronunciation of You is as same as you've?
Is the pronunciation of I is as same as I've?
They share the same vowel pronunciation. The difference you hear may have to do with open and closed syllables:

[u:]
Open syllable: you
Closed syllable: you've

[ay]
Open syllable: I
Closed syllable: I've
 

Casiopea

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james_chew_84 said:
Could you please me what open and closed syllable are?. Sorry for being ignorant.
A syllable is made up of a vowel:

EX: The word 'a' is a syllable.

A syllable can start with a consonant:

EX: 'no' is a syllable. It's a CV syllable. C for consonant and V for vowel.

A syllable can end in a consonant:

EX: 'not' is a syllable. It's a CVC syllable. It ends in a consonant.

A syllable that ends in a consonant is called a closed syllable, whereas a syllable that ends in a vowel is called an open syllable:

Syllables
V: a (open)
CV: no (open)
CVC: not (closed)
VC: an (closed)
CCVC: star (closed)
CCVCC: start (closed

The word you ([yu:]) is an open syllable: it ends in a vowel.
The word you've [yuv] is a closed syllable: it ends in a consonant.
 
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