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bmo

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Jul 24, 2003
1. Studying Bible will give me more vocabulary.

Should it be, "Studying the Bible will give me more words?" When do you use vocabulary in a plural form?

2. It is unfair (to, for) you. Is the choice to?

3. Is it God's blessing (to, for) me? Is the choice to?

Thanks.

BMO
 

MikeNewYork

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bmo said:
1. Studying Bible will give me more vocabulary.

Should it be, "Studying the Bible will give me more words?" When do you use vocabulary in a plural form?

2. It is unfair (to, for) you. Is the choice to?

3. Is it God's blessing (to, for) me? Is the choice to?

Thanks.

BMO

1. It should be "Studying the Bible will increase/improve/expand my vocabulary.

2. That one can be either.

Your boss is very unfair to you.
It is unfair for you to deny me that promotion.

3. Normally, I would say "God's blessing on you", but I'd like to see a context.
 

bmo

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Thanks Mike. These two sentences, it's unfair for you to deny me that promotion and your boss is very unfair to you, seem to be very clear. In the following sentence:

It is unfair (for, to) you to have to do all that work by yourself while others are sitting around doing absolutely nothing. Should I use "to?"

I have other questions:

1. Are you preparing for some kinds of tests? If the person is preparing for more than one test, do you say "kinds?"

2. My hobbies are, you guess it, English writing, grammar, vocabulary and idioms. Is "you guess it" correct? It is more than one hobby though.

BMO
 

MikeNewYork

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Joined
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Member Type
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United States
bmo said:
Thanks Mike. These two sentences, it's unfair for you to deny me that promotion and your boss is very unfair to you, seem to be very clear. In the following sentence:

It is unfair (for, to) you to have to do all that work by yourself while others are sitting around doing absolutely nothing. Should I use "to?"

I have other questions:

1. Are you preparing for some kinds of tests? If the person is preparing for more than one test, do you say "kinds?"

2. My hobbies are, you guess it, English writing, grammar, vocabulary and idioms. Is "you guess it" correct? It is more than one hobby though.

BMO

It is unfair (for, to) you to have to do all that work by yourself while others are sitting around doing absolutely nothing. Should I use "to?"

I would use "for" there, but "to" would not be wrong. I prefer 'for" so that three uses of "to" do not occur in a row.

1. Are you preparing for some kinds of tests? If the person is preparing for more than one test, do you say "kinds?"

2. My hobbies are, you guess it, English writing, grammar, vocabulary and idioms. Is "you guess it" correct? It is more than one hobby though.


1. Yes, one could use "kinds" if the tests are different types.

2. No, we would use "guessed" there. The idea is that they knew it before you said it. Hobby can be pluralized to hobbies.
 
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