Put up with

RonBee

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I will not put up with that sort of behavior.
What does put up with mean?

:)
 

saleemabu

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To Put Up With All These Miseries

Saleemabu
 

Anglika

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Different topic - but means out of place. Fish live in water, so if they are out of the waetr, they are out of place
 
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Hello, RonBee,

"I would not put up with that kind of behavior," is not
the correct language. Instead, you should have said,
"I will not tolerate that kind of behavior."

Roberta
 

RonBee

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Hello, RonBee,

"I would not put up with that kind of behavior," is not
the correct language. Instead, you should have said,
"I will not tolerate that kind of behavior."

Roberta

Sorry, you are wrong. Put up with means tolerate (as was previously stated).
:-|

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This section is for asking questions of ESL learners.
 

engee30

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Sorry, you are wrong. Put up with means tolerate (as was previously stated).

I'm sure Roberta meant 'is not correct FORMAL language'. :)
 

RonBee

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engee30

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Perhaps. But she would still be wrong. :-|

~R

Yeah, right. So what about Roberta's meaning to say, 'is the correct but not appropriate or acceptable very formal language'. :roll:
 

RonBee

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Yeah, right. So what about Roberta's meaning to say, 'is the correct but not appropriate or acceptable very formal language'. :roll:

Wow, that's a mouthful! ;-)

I am not sure what is (possibly) meant by "very formal language", but "put up with" is a phrasal verb. It is not slang.

~R

P.S. Do you know the famous phrase in which Winston Churchill used the phrasal verb "put up with"?

:)
 

engee30

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P.S. Do you know the famous phrase in which Winston Churchill used the phrasal verb "put up with"?

:)

I think you're about ending, I mean in this case, avoiding ending a sentence with a preposition. But I'm not so sure about that. :-|
 

RonBee

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I think you're about ending, I mean in this case, avoiding ending a sentence with a preposition. But I'm not so sure about that. :-|

Yes. He disapproved of that rule, and he said it (somebody correcting his sentences so they were "correct" in that fashion) was something "up with which he would not put". (I'm paraphrasing.) He was making fun of the rule at the same time as he was expressing his displeasure with it.

~R
 

engee30

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Yes. He disapproved of that rule, and he said it (somebody correcting his sentences so they were "correct" in that fashion) was something "up with which he would not put". (I'm paraphrasing.) He was making fun of the rule at the same time as he was expressing his displeasure with it.

~R

Wow, so I was right in my guessing. Thanks. :up: It's really interesting, so interesting that I've just found a website on which the issue was commented on. Have a look yourself, if you like. :)
Language Log: A misattribution no longer to be put up with
 

RonBee

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engee30

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Interesting story. So Churchill didn't really say that after all? Oh well.

:)

Your guess is as good as mine. :?: :up:
 
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Buddhaheart

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I think RonBee is correct. ‘Put up with’ is commonly used to mean ‘tolerate’, ‘endure’ or ‘bear with patient’. It may be considered a phrasal verb by some but an idiom by other.
 

Teia

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I will not put up with that sort of behavior.
What does put up with mean?

:)

I won`t tolerate that sort of behaviour.
 
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