Question about the use of a subjunctve verb

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Hi, I would like to kow whether in the following sentence I should use CAN or COULD:

"the innovative points of this study are 1)..... 2) the definition of curves that could/can be considered typial for a certain kind of materials"

One moere thing: the adjective MULTIFOLDED.... can it be used to mean that a certain issue has several aspects to consider (in the sense of MULTIFACETED....which I do not lik :) ) ?

"... in a scenario as multifolded as the one described herein...."

thanks in advance

Patrick
 

Niall

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Could sounds like it is possible, but not likely
whereas can simply suggests that it is possible.

In answer to your second question, I have never heard the word "multifolded" being used at all, and would suggest that if you can use it, then it isn't in common usage, and sounds a bit odd.
 

David L.

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"The innovative points of this study are the definition of curves that can be considered typical for a certain kind of material."

"... in a scenario as multifold as the one described herein...."

However, I doubt whether 'multifold' is correct in this context. How about 'complex' ?
What actually IS the context? What are you referring to?
 
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trapanipalermo

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"..for a certain kind of material.."... may I say " certain kinds of material" ? just out of curiosiy :)

As for multifolded... I think I'll eventually change it to avoid misinterpretation... do you have any suggestion? The meaning I would lie to get through is that "a certain application is used in a wide rane of activities, for this reason the approach to this application is multidisciplinary"... I hope it makes snse somehow :)
 

David L.

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I remember my high school English teacher spending a lot of time on this!
Using the plural 'materials', the phrase becomes, 'certain kinds of materials'

The word you need is 'diverse'
 

David L.

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I remember my high school English teacher spending a lot of time on this!
Using the plural 'materials', the phrase becomes, 'certain kinds of materials'


the word you need is 'diverse'
 

riverkid

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"..for a certain kind of material.."... may I say " certain kinds of material" ? just out of curiosiy :)

As for multifolded... I think I'll eventually change it to avoid misinterpretation... do you have any suggestion? The meaning I would lie to get through is that "a certain application is used in a wide rane of activities, for this reason the approach to this application is multidisciplinary"... I hope it makes snse somehow :)

Possibly 'multifaceted' would work for you, T.

++++++++++++++++++++

M-W:

multifaceted

Main Entry:
mul·ti·fac·e·ted

Function:
adjective
Date:
1870

: having many facets or aspects

++++++++++++

Just reread your first posting. I'm not sure why you don't like the word but, of course, that's a personal choice only you can make.
 

riverkid

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Hi, I would like to know whether in the following sentence I should use CAN or COULD:

"the innovative points of this study are 1)..... 2) the definition of curves that could/can be considered typical for a certain kind of materials"

Patrick

In English, I don't think that can and could are considered subjunctive verbs.

Either can or could can/could be used, Patrick and really, only you can decide which it is you want. Using 'could' illustrates a greater tentativeness in the assertion while 'can' illustrates a more assured viewpoint. Perhaps more context would/will point to one or the other as more in keeping with the overall text.
 

trapanipalermo

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I thought that if I used COULD instead of CAN, I would make a subjunctive phrase...

I will change "multifolded" into "multifaceted".... if "multifolded" sounds awkard to so many of you, then it can't be the proper choice.

Do you know any site where I can find a list of proper collocations of adverbs nd adjectives.... I mean where can I find a list like "utterly successful", "deeply investigated", and so on...

Can you correct the errors in this sentence:
"the conclusive part of the paper has been extended in order to include possible rules to reduce errors and to make the obtained results more easily usable"

Thanks again
Patrick (Patrizio)
 
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riverkid

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I thought that if I used COULD instead of CAN, I would make a subjunctive phrase...

I will change "multifolded" into "multifaceted".... if "multifolded" sounds awkard to so many of you, then it can't be the proper choice.

I'm not sure that 'multifolded' is a word used in this manner in English, T. Perhaps you mean 'multifold'.



multifold
M-W:
Main Entry:
mul·ti·fold
Function:
adjective
Date:
1806

: many, numerous


Do you know any site where I can find a list of proper collocations of adverbs nd adjectives.... I mean where can I find a list like "utterly successful", "deeply investigated", and so on...

I've never heard 'deeply investigated', Patrizio, though I suppose it's possible; 'thoroughly investigated' is a common collocation.

Can you correct the errors in this sentence:
"the conclusive part of the paper has been extended in order to include possible rules to reduce errors and to make the obtained results more easily usable"

Thanks again
Patrick (Patrizio)

#
 

riverkid

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"the conclusive part of the paper has been extended in order to include possible rules to reduce errors and to make the obtained results more easily usable"

It seems fine to me.
 

Neillythere

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Hi

I'm not a teacher, but the subject of "modal verbs" came up on this site recently. As I'd never come across the term, I looked it up.

"Can", "could" etc are "modal verbs".
For more details on "Modal verbs" see ENGLISH PAGE - Modal Verb Tutorial
It has some good explanations.

Regards
 

riverkid

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It also has some bad explanations, Neillythere.

Interesting that this site describes would as the past of will but it doesn't state anything similar for the other modal pairings such as can/could, may/might, even shall/should.

would
past of "will" I said I would help you.

He told me he would be here before 8:00.

Another odd thing, it describes might as the conditional of may.

might
conditional of may

1. If I entered the contest, I might actually win.

2. If I had entered the contest, I might actually have won.

3. If I entered the contest tomorrow, I might actually win. Unfortunately, I can't enter it.

Whatever do they mean by this? Modal verbs are part of conditional sentences but they are not conditionals in and of themselves.

If I go there, I see people dancing.

No modals but we have a conditional sentence. Now if a person wants to express levels of doubt, modals are used to do this.

If I go there, I may see people dancing.

If I go there, I might see people dancing.

might is not acting as a "conditional" of may. may simply expresses less doubt than might.

One of the good things about this site is that they are making some progress in getting away from the errant idea that modals have tense. They simply describe how modals are used in past, present and future situations. It ain't poifect but it's a start.
 
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