Question tag

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Red5

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Has she or not?
 

MikeNewYork

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jiz07 said:
she hasn't got a dog :( :

When the question is negative, the tag is positive.

She hasn't got a dog, has she?

She has got a dog, hasn't she?

Does that help? :?
 

RonBee

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MikeNewYork said:
jiz07 said:
she hasn't got a dog :( :

When the question is negative, the tag is positive.

She hasn't got a dog, has she?

She has got a dog, hasn't she?

Does that help? :?

No. She needs a dog, doesn't she?

:wink:
 

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RonBee said:
No. She needs a dog, doesn't she?

:wink:

She sure does. :!: :!: :!: :!: :!: :wink:
 

RonBee

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Awten said:
What? <--my question...

  • You have a question, do you?

    :wink:

Occasionally, you can use a question tag either as a negative (with "not") or a positive (without "not"). However, the statement means different things depending on which is used. For example, "You have a question, do you?" would most likely be a sort of challenge. "You have a question, don't you?" is a more conciliatory type statement.

:)
 
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