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Denis-777

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1. Nick has got to go to the dentist today, ... he?
2. Mary is to do this task in the written form, ... she?
3. They always have their linen washed at the laundry, ... they?
 

5jj

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Welcome to the forum, Denis. :hi:

We like people to have a try themselves before we try to help. What do you think the answers might be?
 

Denis-777

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1. Nick has got to go to the dentist today, doesn't he?
2. Mary is to do this task in the written form, doesn't she?
3. They always have their linen washed at the laundry, haven't they?

1,2) have to / has to (has got to) / be to = these verbs have a modal meaning ... According to the rule: "If there is a modal verb in the main part of the sentence the question tag uses the same modal verb". ... but these are not on the list of other modals. So is it correct to use auxiliary have / do etc. in the second part?
 

5jj

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1. Nick has got to go to the dentist today, doesn't he?
2. Mary is to do this task in the written form, doesn't she?
3. They always have their linen washed at the laundry, haven't they?

1,2) have to / has to (has got to) / be to = these verbs have a modal meaning ... According to the rule: "If there is a modal verb in the main part of the sentence the question tag uses the same modal verb". ... but these are not on the list of other modals. So is it correct to use auxiliary have / do etc. in the second part?
1. In the form 'have got to', 'have functions as an auxiliary; in the form 'have to' 'have' functions as a lexical verb (ignore the fact that it has 'modal meaning') So:

Nick has to go the the dentist today, doesn't he?
Nick has got to go to the dentist today, hasn't he?


However, particularly in speech, people sometimes conflate these two forms of the verb, and you will hear:

Nick has to go the the dentist today, hasn't he?

and, though it's far less likely:

Nick has got to go to the dentist today, doesn't he?

2. In 'is to', 'is' functions as a lexical verb (once again, ignore the fact that it has 'modal meaning'. BE, whether it is used as a lexical or as an auxiliary verb, does not need the dummy auxiliary DO (except in the emphatic and negative imperatives). So, it's:

Mary is to do this task in the written form, isn't she?

3. Causative HAVE is a lexical verb. It's:

They always have their linen washed at the laundry, don't they?
 

Denis-777

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Thanks a lot :hi:
 
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