Question...what is the rule?

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BelCanto

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Hello,

I have a question about the following sentences:

**Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in that I am directly involved.
OR
Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections that I am directly involved in.**

Which one is correct? Or, are they both?
I am wondering about the “in” being at the end of a sentence. Is that incorrect?


Here is another:
** Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions we were hoping you can help us with.
OR
Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions with which we were hoping you can help us. **

Same type of thing. Is the “with” at the end of the sentence correct? Also, what is the "rule" surrounding this?

Thank you very much for your help.

--BelCanto
 

MikeNewYork

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BelCanto said:
Hello,

I have a question about the following sentences:

**Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in that I am directly involved.
OR
Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections that I am directly involved in.**

Which one is correct? Or, are they both?
I am wondering about the “in” being at the end of a sentence. Is that incorrect?


Here is another:
** Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions we were hoping you can help us with.
OR
Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions with which we were hoping you can help us. **

Same type of thing. Is the “with” at the end of the sentence correct? Also, what is the "rule" surrounding this?

Thank you very much for your help.

--BelCanto

**Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in that I am directly involved.
OR
Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections that I am directly involved in.**

Which one is correct? Or, are they both?
I am wondering about the “in” being at the end of a sentence. Is that incorrect?


Ending a sentence with a preposition is not as much of a problem as it used to be. Nevertheless, there are still those who object to the practice. In formal writing, I avoid terminal prepositions, but that is a personal choice.

Your first sentence is not correct as written. You must use "which" instead of that in constructions like this one. "Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in which I am directly involved.

** Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions we were hoping you can help us with.
OR
Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions with which we were hoping you can help us. **


This second sentence allows me to make a good teaching point. One can create overly complicated sentences when one tries to avoid terminal prepositions. These types of sentences are usually used by individuals to make it appear that avoiding terminal prepositions causes problems. The correct solution, however, is to rephrase the statement. Your first version is acceptable, even with the terminal preposition, but it would be better without it, IMO. Your second version is not acceptable to me. It turns the sentence inside out, trying to avoid ending with "with". Try this:

We were hoping that you could answer a couple of questions for us before we place the ad. This avoids the terminal preposition and the messy sentence. :)
 
B

BelCanto

Guest
THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR HELP.

--Jennifer

MikeNewYork said:
BelCanto said:
Hello,

I have a question about the following sentences:

**Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in that I am directly involved.
OR
Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections that I am directly involved in.**

Which one is correct? Or, are they both?
I am wondering about the “in” being at the end of a sentence. Is that incorrect?


Here is another:
** Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions we were hoping you can help us with.
OR
Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions with which we were hoping you can help us. **

Same type of thing. Is the “with” at the end of the sentence correct? Also, what is the "rule" surrounding this?

Thank you very much for your help.

--BelCanto

**Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in that I am directly involved.
OR
Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections that I am directly involved in.**

Which one is correct? Or, are they both?
I am wondering about the “in” being at the end of a sentence. Is that incorrect?


Ending a sentence with a preposition is not as much of a problem as it used to be. Nevertheless, there are still those who object to the practice. In formal writing, I avoid terminal prepositions, but that is a personal choice.

Your first sentence is not correct as written. You must use "which" instead of that in constructions like this one. "Given the scope of this report I will only talk about the implementations of the sections in which I am directly involved.

** Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions we were hoping you can help us with.
OR
Prior to placing the ad, we have a couple of questions with which we were hoping you can help us. **


This second sentence allows me to make a good teaching point. One can create overly complicated sentences when one tries to avoid terminal prepositions. These types of sentences are usually used by individuals to make it appear that avoiding terminal prepositions causes problems. The correct solution, however, is to rephrase the statement. Your first version is acceptable, even with the terminal preposition, but it would be better without it, IMO. Your second version is not acceptable to me. It turns the sentence inside out, trying to avoid ending with "with". Try this:

We were hoping that you could answer a couple of questions for us before we place the ad. This avoids the terminal preposition and the messy sentence. :)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
You're very welcome!
 
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