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greenhand

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with a biscuit which ( ) the boot of his car .
a. took complete possession of
b. took up all the the space in
c. completely covered
d. on the whole filled

===========
someone asked why (d) is not the right answer?

tks
 

Francois

Senior Member
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Jun 15, 2004
'on the whole' means all things considered eg. on the whole it's a good shop.
'...filled the whole boot...' would have been correct.

It's a dogzilla biscuit!

FRC
 

gonghai

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greenhand said:
with a biscuit which ( ) the boot of his car .
a. took complete possession of
b. took up all the the space in
c. completely covered
d. on the whole filled

===========
someone asked why (d) is not the right answer?

tks

biscuit???
that sentence sounds funny.. logically it sounds incorrect, or weird :shock:

however :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

MikeNewYork

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Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
shane said:
That's a big biscuit! ;)

Big dog? :roll:

Are we talking about a cookie which completely filled the trunk of a car?
Wow, that's some cookie!
:D

Or some biscuit. They are a bit different in the US. :wink:
 
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Susie Smith

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MikeNewYork said:
Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
shane said:
That's a big biscuit! ;)

Big dog? :roll:

Are we talking about a cookie which completely filled the trunk of a car?
Wow, that's some cookie!
:D

Or some biscuit. They are a bit different in the US. :wink:

I know. I love our baking powder biscuits, still hot, cut through the middle, and spread with butter. I wonder what the British call the things we Americans call biscuits.
:? :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
shane said:
That's a big biscuit! ;)

Big dog? :roll:

Are we talking about a cookie which completely filled the trunk of a car?
Wow, that's some cookie!
:D

Or some biscuit. They are a bit different in the US. :wink:

I know. I love our baking powder biscuits, still hot, cut through the middle, and spread with butter. I wonder what the British call the things we Americans call biscuits.
:? :wink:

Probably chips ot crisps. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Tdol

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I dread to think what you call a 'biscuit'. Is it a 'Sharp Pressed American Biscuit'? :lol:
 

RonBee

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greenhand said:
with a biscuit which ( ) the boot of his car .
a. took complete possession of
b. took up all the the space in
c. completely covered
d. on the whole filled

===========
someone asked why (d) is not the right answer?

tks

It's a good question! After all, "filled" (It should be "on the whole, filled") and "took up all the space in" mean the same thing.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
I dread to think what you call a 'biscuit'. Is it a 'Sharp Pressed American Biscuit'? :lol:

We call a bisuit a biscuit and a cookie a cookie. Amazing stuff. :lol: :lol:
 

MikeNewYork

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Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
I dread to think what you call a 'biscuit'. Is it a 'Sharp Pressed American Biscuit'? :lol:

We call a bisuit a biscuit and a cookie a cookie. Amazing stuff. :lol: :lol:

:cheers:

:wink: 8) :wink: 8)
 

MikeNewYork

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Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
tdol said:
I dread to think what you call a 'biscuit'. Is it a 'Sharp Pressed American Biscuit'? :lol:

We call a bisuit a biscuit and a cookie a cookie. Amazing stuff. :lol: :lol:

:cheers:

:wink: 8) :wink: 8)
 

Tdol

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OK, so what exactly is a 'biscuit' American styleee. ;-)
 

Tdol

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OK, so what exactly is a 'biscuit' American styleee. ;-)
 
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Susie Smith

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tdol said:
OK, so what exactly is a 'biscuit' American styleee. ;-)

Webster says it's a small, soft, raised bread usually leavened with baking powder or soda. I'd say biscuits belong to the quick bread family. Quick breads are those made with a leavening agent, as baking powder or soda, that permits immediate baking. Usually there is no sugar in the recipe, although they can be topped with marmelade, etc.; and they are served hot.

:)
 
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Susie Smith

Guest
tdol said:
OK, so what exactly is a 'biscuit' American styleee. ;-)

Webster says it's a small, soft, raised bread usually leavened with baking powder or soda. I'd say biscuits belong to the quick bread family. Quick breads are those made with a leavening agent, as baking powder or soda, that permits immediate baking. Usually there is no sugar in the recipe, although they can be topped with marmelade, etc.; and they are served hot.

:)
 
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