Quite\Rather 2

The film was ___ better than I'd expected.


  • Total voters
    147

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
What's the rule? ;-)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
One is used. The other is not.

:wink:
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
You could say:

  • The film was quite a bit better than I'd expected.

:)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
That's cheating. ;-)
 

Red5

Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
RonBee said:
One is used. The other is not.

:wink:

:lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Red5

Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Re: rather

valtango said:
or simply, the film was better than I expected..

Very true, and in my opinion, preferable. ;-)
 

ion Joe

Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2004
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
Can I say quite good or rather bad?
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
ion Joe said:
Can I say quite good or rather bad?

Yes, you can use either, although preferably not at the same time.

:wink:
 

Ashok K Thapa

Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Nepali
Home Country
Nepal
Current Location
Hong Kong
quite better? rather better? Why not just say better than..... I am confused!!
 

meylenlau

Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Good, better and best , these are 3 degrees of the irregular adjective.

If we want to express the second degree of it ,so we use ‘better’ alone rather than ‘quite better’.But for the first degree “good’ ,”quite good’ is commonly used.
 

rhapsomatrics

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Yoruba
Home Country
Nigeria
Current Location
Nigeria
Be advised that this is a public poll: other users can see the choice(s) you selected.
Poll Options
The film was ___ better than I'd expected.
quite



I think that one's choice of word is sometimes affected by one's mood.This is why,I think,RATHER is used when expressing somthing in the negative or something unpleasant...that was rather callous of you...that was rather bad of her...that was a rather unpleasant statement you just uttered.
However,IMO,QUITE is used to express not too unpleasant notions...that was quite brave of you...I am quite delighted...I quite agree with you on that...
Other examples...He came quite early...(positive)...He came rather too late(negative)I'm quite happy...not I'm rather happy...
Also,I think,RATHER can be used with adverbs of degree...too,very etc but I don't think QUITE can."He is quite too happy to talk"...I don't think it's right...He is quite happy...he is too happy to talk...he is much too happy to talk...he is rather too sad to talk....
 

aggelos

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2007
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
Greek
Home Country
Greece
Current Location
Greece
rather

I think the 'negative' sense of rather has been overstressed. Rather is not always negative. It can often be used in comparisons, ie to indicate that some quality exists to a higher degree than its opposite quality. In this sense, "the film was rather better than I thought" is a typical example of this use. It could be phrased differently, without a real change in meaning, like this: "the film had more good elements than bad ones, although I didn't expect it would".

Look also at these finds from a Google search:

THE INDEPENDENT

Mr Hague is doing rather better than his party (link)
-----------------
Geoff Hoon (Lord Privy Seal, House of Commons)

It might be rather better if, for a change, the Liberal Democrats lived in the real world and listened to the police, instead of commenting on leaked documents (link)
-----------------
ECONOMIC & SOCIAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

...social science is now rather better focused on some of the most difficult medium to long-term issues facing the UK... (link)
-----------------
'Yes. Rather better than twelve years ago.' 'Rather better?' said Mr Meagles, 'you mean rather worse...' (link)
-----------------

By the way, a Google search produced these results:
-quite better: 53400
-rather better: 215000
 
Last edited:

rhapsomatrics

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Yoruba
Home Country
Nigeria
Current Location
Nigeria
I think I agree with you that the word RATHER does not always depict negativity,however,I honestly do not think that quoting from the house of commoms is particularly authoritative.
 

Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2005
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Iraq
Current Location
Germany
Rather can be used with:
1. Negative adjectives: The soup is rather cold.
2. Positive adjectives to express surprise. Here rather changes its meaning to very: it was rather clean: more than clean and more than I expected.
 

quantumphyser

New member
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Vietnamese
Home Country
Vietnam
Current Location
Vietnam
No need to discuss more.I think Tdol should show the official solution.
 

Ferrus

New member
Joined
Jan 22, 2008
Member Type
English Teacher
Would it be worth considering the difference in register between the two?
 
Top