Quite\Rather 3

It's ___ good.


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Tdol

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What's the rule? ;-)
 

RonBee

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How did you like your dinner?
A. It's quite good.
B. It's rather good.

:)
 

Latoof

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The food would be either good or bad, it depends who prepared it. If I am the one who prepared it so be sure that you are going to enjoy it.:lol:
 

RonBee

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Latoof said:
The food would be either good or bad, it depends who prepared it. If I am the one who prepared it so be sure that you are going to enjoy it.:lol:
Um, try:
If I am the one who prepared it you can be sure that you would enjoy it.

(I like spaghetti, and, indeeed, all kinds of pasta. I also like cherry pie. :-D )

(I would be unlikely to use either quite good or rather good, butI dothink that quite good makes a more postive statement. (I prefer very good.))

:)
 

Tdol

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In BrE, we use both. They aren't as strong as 'very'. :)
 
R

reiyumoa

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I understand "quite" in BE often sounds mediocre. Is this correct?
By the way, which is better, "quite good" or "pretty good"?
 

trustM

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quite GOOD ("good" being stressed) has a positive meaning-I liked it.
QUITE good ("quite" being stressed) has a negative meaning-I didn't like it.
 
R

reiyumoa

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Sorry for changing the topic.
Please continue "quite" and "rather" discussion as I will ask mine
sometime in the future.
 

Tdol

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'Pretty' is widely used in British English too. ;-)
 
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reiyumoa

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If I may continue "quite" and "pretty" discussion a little more, I wonder if someone could tell me the difference both in BE and AE.
 

RonBee

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You will not, I think, hear either "quite good" or "rather good" very often in AE. Instead, expect to hear "pretty good" and "very good".

:)
 

csharp

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You can find some information about the difference between them, visit link
Content Frame
So i think the answer is "quite" :))
And this's the conclusion:
- Quite is more force than Rather
- Rather is often used to describle "sth bad, unsuitable, etc" :))
- Quite may be used with a, the, or some and a noun, but Rather is only used with a.

If there's sth wrong, please correct it. Merci.
 
Last edited:

Katz

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I always thought that "quite" in BrE can also mean "completely" (hence expressions like -> quite the contrary, quite the opposite), although I've been told to be careful with this meaning, as it apparently is non-existent in AmE.

Am I wrong...? :shock:
 

RonBee

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There is some "bleeding" between AE and BE. We can't quite keep them apart.
;-)
 

çakırpençe

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and we've "quiet" :)
sometimes we are by those two.
illimunate us, please with the pronunciation and the meaning.
on the other hand, do we use "with" with "illimunate"
or this word is true here ?
 

RonBee

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The word quiet has two syllables (kweye-et). It means (a)lack of sound, or (b)to eliminate noise.

Question: Do we use "with" with "illimunate"?
Answer: Sometimes. Apparently (I have only consulted myself), when it is used literally ("Illuminate the room") it is not used with "with", but when used figuratively ("Illuminate us with your wisdom") it is.

~R
 

Wuisi

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As far as I know both are possible here. I have been told 'rather' is a bit stronger than 'quite' but that depends on stress and context. By the way, is it true that 'rather' goes with adjectives expressing negative ideas -'rather ugly'-? Isn't it 'a bit' or 'a little' -a bit ugly-?. Thanks
 
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