Quite\rather

It's ____ the best film I've seen this year.


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Tdol

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What's the rule? ;-)
 

RonBee

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I would vote neither. I might say:

  • It's simply the best film I've seen this year.

Or:

  • It's definitely the best film I've seen this year.

:)
 

Tdol

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Maybe it's BE. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Tdol

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We use quite\rather with the base form of an adjective, rather with the comparative and quite with the superlative. ;-)
 

rhapsomatrics

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"Quite" and" rather",though somewhat similar,have basic contextual and grammatical diferences.While "rather",more often than not,shows contrast "quite"does the work of emphasis...It's RATHER unusual...a change from naturality...it's been quite an age...emphasis....
 
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Dr. Jamshid Ibrahim

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"Quite" and" rather",though somewhat similar,have basic contextual and grammatical diferences.While "rather",more often than not,shows contrast "quite"does the work of emphasis...It's RATHER unusual...a change from naturality...it's been quite an age...emphasis....

Rather can be used in two different ways:
1. With negative adjectives: The soup is rather cold. In this case "fairly is used with positive adjectives: The soup is fairly hot.
2. With positive adjectives when it changes its meaning to "very" and imply surprise: His office was rather tidy. He was rather intelligent. The speaker here expresses his/her surprise at sth not expected.
 

BobK

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We use quite\rather with the base form of an adjective, rather with the comparative and quite with the superlative. ;-)

Well, who'd a thunk it - learn something every day. :up:

b

PS
On re-reading, I guess I should explain: 'Who would have thought it?' (a common expression of surprise at a new discovery) - sorry, it just came out that way.
 
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Tdol

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I think 'thunk' has earned its place in our, er, thunking. ;-)
 

JACOOL

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I think "rather" is more appropriate, but here I've got a question, can use "quite" with superlative forms?
 

Tdol

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It was rather better than I was expecting.
It was quite the best dinner I have had there.
 

JACOOL

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It was rather better than I was expecting.
It was quite the best dinner I have had there.
I see, thanks alot:up:
 

Tdol

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You're welcome, Jacool. ;-)
 

boothling

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Sort of on topic:

I observed an EFL class yesterday. The teacher informed the students that "quite" was an intensifier, whereas "rather" and "fairly" were downtoners.

She insisted that there were major differences between the following phrases:

It's quite hot.

and

It's rather hot.
It's fairly hot.

Personally, I don't see much difference. Neither did one of her students, who suggested that "quite" could function equally well as a downtoner (whatever that is -- I can't find the term in any dictionary).

What do you think?
 

Tdol

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I don't agree with her- quite can go both ways- quite brilliant vs quite good, and there are differences between BrE and AE over what 'quite ill' means. With the 'hot' examples, I see little or no difference in BrE- quite/fairly/rather hot seem the same to me.
 

BobK

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Sort of on topic:

I observed an EFL class yesterday. The teacher informed the students that "quite" was an intensifier, whereas "rather" and "fairly" were downtoners.

She insisted that there were major differences between the following phrases:

It's quite hot.

and

It's rather hot.
It's fairly hot.

Personally, I don't see much difference. Neither did one of her students, who suggested that "quite" could function equally well as a downtoner (whatever that is -- I can't find the term in any dictionary).

What do you think?

I'm with Tdol as to not agreeing, though I do see a difference; not the one she was preaching. The way I see it:

It's rather hot - implies the speaker is on the verge of finding it uncomfortable; they might be suggesting they'd like a window opened.

It's fairly hot - concedes that other people may find it hot, although the speaker is quite comfortable for the time being.

I assume that the new word downtoner (which I haven't met before either) refers to a word that tones down the intensity of another. Assuming this sense, I'd say there were contexts where 'quite' was one.

b
 
M

Marcus Aurelius

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From a linguistic standpoint neither answer is appropriate. The meaning of both words in this sentence would be synonymous with "very". By substituting very in place of the words you can see that this sentence would fall outside the conventions of English regardless of locale.
 

Tdol

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I don't agree at all- the use of 'quite' here has a meaning similar to 'absolutely' and, while I cannot comment on all locales, is perfectly standard in British English.
 

BobK

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From a linguistic standpoint neither answer is appropriate. The meaning of both words in this sentence would be synonymous with "very". By substituting very in place of the words you can see that this sentence would fall outside the conventions of English regardless of locale.

:down: You are ignoring - perhaps because you don't know - a possible meaning of 'quite'. It has nothing to do with 'very', but means 'by a long way/easily/far and away'.

b
 
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