redoubtable?

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Jenny Lau

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How to understand "redoubtable" here? What does "some redoubtable said antique" mean?
Here is the sentence:
The Different Junque Shoppe catered to odd tastes of off-the-wall preferences, erotic art, bizarre art and some redoubtable said "antiques".
 

MikeNewYork

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Jenny Lau said:
How to understand "redoubtable" here? What does "some redoubtable said antique" mean?
Here is the sentence:
The Different Junque Shoppe catered to odd tastes of off-the-wall preferences, erotic art, bizarre art and some redoubtable said "antiques".

Redoubtable can mean "awe/fear inspiring" or "worthy of honor or respect". In this case, I assume it means respectable/honored. The "said" doesn't fit there, however. :wink:
 

Jenny Lau

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Respectable "antiques"? Does respectable here mean "of moderately good quality" ?
I have thought the word "respectable/honored" usually describe a person. And why antiques use quotation marks?
 

Tdol

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Respectable in comparison to erotic art?;-)
 
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Susie Smith

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tdol said:
Respectable in comparison to erotic art?;-)

redoubtable = formidable
for·mi·da·ble (fôr“m¹-d…-b…l) adj. 1. Arousing fear, dread, or alarm: the formidable prospect of major surgery.

The first time I read the post, I looked up "redoubtable" and then interpreted the phrase this way: formidable examples of so-called antiques. In other words, dreadful fakes. Does this make sense?
 

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Susie Smith said:
tdol said:
Respectable in comparison to erotic art?;-)

redoubtable = formidable
for·mi·da·ble (fôr“m¹-d…-b…l) adj. 1. Arousing fear, dread, or alarm: the formidable prospect of major surgery.

The first time I read the post, I looked up "redoubtable" and then interpreted the phrase this way: formidable examples of so-called antiques. In other words, dreadful fakes. Does this make sense?

I don't think the formidable use makes sense, but I think you have figured out the puzzle. Perhaps the word "said" is supposed to be "so-called" or "alleged". Then the quotation marks around "antiques" mean that theantiques are fakes. :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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Jenny Lau said:
Respectable "antiques"? Does respectable here mean "of moderately good quality" ?
I have thought the word "respectable/honored" usually describe a person. And why antiques use quotation marks?

I'm not sure that "redoubtable" is the best choice there. I think the sense of the sentence is that these "antiques" are not really antiques at all.
 
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Susie Smith

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MikeNewYork said:
Jenny Lau said:
Respectable "antiques"? Does respectable here mean "of moderately good quality" ?
I have thought the word "respectable/honored" usually describe a person. And why antiques use quotation marks?

I'm not sure that "redoubtable" is the best choice there. I think the sense of the sentence is that these "antiques" are not really antiques at all.

For many years I worked as a translator and believe me, people don't always say what they mean, as you also know, of course. :D I think the person who wrote the article meant doubtful, and he or she also misused "said", for the intended meaning must be so-called. It reminded me of something Tdol wrote, I think, in his archives. It was all about somebody who had used the word "meretricious" as deserved or deserving, I don't remember which now. :) I'm pretty sure we've cracked it.

:D :D :D :D
 

Tdol

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People often use big words without looking them up first. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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Susie Smith said:
MikeNewYork said:
Jenny Lau said:
Respectable "antiques"? Does respectable here mean "of moderately good quality" ?
I have thought the word "respectable/honored" usually describe a person. And why antiques use quotation marks?

I'm not sure that "redoubtable" is the best choice there. I think the sense of the sentence is that these "antiques" are not really antiques at all.

For many years I worked as a translator and believe me, people don't always say what they mean, as you also know, of course. :D I think the person who wrote the article meant doubtful, and he or she also misused "said", for the intended meaning must be so-called. It reminded me of something Tdol wrote, I think, in his archives. It was all about somebody who had used the word "meretricious" as deserved or deserving, I don't remember which now. :) I'm pretty sure we've cracked it.

:D :D :D :D

I completely agree. :shock:
 
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