Regis

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Hello everybody,
I'm writing an extract from a dialog containing some expression which are not that clear to my.
The dialogue is between David Letterman and Hilary Clinton. They're talking about the Democratic South Carolina debate held on 01/21.
I do not intend to raise any political debate.

David Letterman: You looked great together. And I think I was looking at the Democratic ticket.
(David is referring to Hilary Clinton and Barack Obama standing together on the stage during the debate)
Hilary Clinton: I've been giving a lot of careful consideration to that. And..... it's really down to you and regis (or Regis? capital letter).

1) The expression Democratic ticket sounds pretty odd to me. Is it a sort of idiomatic or metaphoric expression?
2) I don't understand what it's really down to you and regis means. And I can't understand what regis itself means. Is it a name? Regis? and if so who are they talking about?

Hope you can help me
Thank you
 
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mykwyner

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The Democratic ticket means the two people who will be running for president and vice-president for the Democratic party. Letterman means that whoever wins the nomination (Hillary or Barak) should choose the other for the vice-presidential candidate. Hillary then joked that her choice for her vice-president was between Letterman and Regis Philbin, who is another television talk-show host.
 
Joined
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Student or Learner
The Democratic ticket means the two people who will be running for president and vice-president for the Democratic party. Letterman means that whoever wins the nomination (Hillary or Barak) should choose the other for the vice-presidential candidate. Hillary then joked that her choice for her vice-president was between Letterman and Regis Philbin, who is another television talk-show host.

Thank you very much for your reply.
I believe this was really emblematic of how just knowing a language is not enough to understand what speakers of that language say - you need to know its culture as well. :lol:
Does the expression to be down to used by Hilary always imply a choice between two or more people? I can't find it in any dictionary.
 

mykwyner

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Yes, to be down to means is reduced to.
 
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