relative clause

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hela

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Dear teachers,

Would you please tell me if my answers are correct?

I Combine the following sentence into one, using a relative pronoun.

At my school, English is taught by two teachers. These two teachers are not native speakers.
a) At my school, English is taught by two teachers, neither of whom is a native speaker.
b) At my … two teachers (,) who are not native speakers. (correct? Is the comma necessary ?)
c) At my … two teachers, both of whom are not native speakers. (correct? Can we use "both" with negative?)

Are the last 2 stces compatible with the initial one?


II Pick out the relative clauses and label them.
That’s the reason why she crammed everything she needed into a tiny bag which would fit underneath her plane seat.

Where do the relative clauses stop?

1) [why (relative adverb) she crammed ... (up to)
a) everything shed needed (?)]
b) … a tiny bag (?)]
c) ... the plane seat (?)] = defining relative clause.

Antecedent = the reason

2) a)[(underlying relative pronoun that) she needed (?)]
b) [she needed ... tiny bag (?) ]
c) [ she needed … the plane seat (?)]

= defining zero relative clause.

Antecedent = everything

3) [which (relative pronoun) would fit underneath her plane seat] = defining relative clause.

Antecedent = a tiny bag

I would be grateful if you could answer this set of questions as soon as possible.

Best regards,
Hela
 

Tdol

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At my school, English is taught by two teachers. These two teachers are not native speakers.
a) At my school, English is taught by two teachers, neither of whom is a native speaker.
b) At my … two teachers (,) who are not native speakers. (correct? Is the comma necessary ?)
c) At my … two teachers, both of whom are not native speakers. (correct? Can we use "both" with negative?)

a and b are fine (I'd use a comma here) - both with a negative doesn't sound too good. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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hela said:
Dear teachers,

Would you please tell me if my answers are correct?

I Combine the following sentence into one, using a relative pronoun.

At my school, English is taught by two teachers. These two teachers are not native speakers.
a) At my school, English is taught by two teachers, neither of whom is a native speaker.
b) At my … two teachers (,) who are not native speakers. (correct? Is the comma necessary ?)
c) At my … two teachers, both of whom are not native speakers. (correct? Can we use "both" with negative?)

I agree with TDOL. A and B are good. C is not so good. I wopuld not use the comma after teachers in B. This is a restrictive clause that defines the teachers.




II Pick out the relative clauses and label them.
That’s the reason why she crammed everything she needed into a tiny bag which would fit underneath her plane seat.

Where do the relative clauses stop?

1) [why (relative adverb) she crammed ... (up to)
a) everything shed needed (?)]
b) … a tiny bag (?)]
c) ... the plane seat (?)] = defining relative clause.

Antecedent = the reason


2) a)[(underlying relative pronoun that) she needed (?)]
b) [she needed ... tiny bag (?) ]
c) [ she needed … the plane seat (?)]

= defining zero relative clause.

Antecedent = everything

3) [which (relative pronoun) would fit underneath her plane seat] = defining relative clause.

Antecedent = a tiny bag

I would be grateful if you could answer this set of questions as soon as possible.

Best regards,
Hela

I don't like the use of the relative adverb here. It would be better to use "that". There are three relative clauses there.

1. that/why she crammed everything (modifies reason)
2. (that) she needed (modifies everything)
3. which would fit under her seat (modifies bag)
 

Tdol

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It sounded non-defining to me, but it could go either way. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

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tdol said:
It sounded non-defining to me, but it could go either way. ;-)

You're right; I can see it either way, now. :wink:
 

Tdol

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