run you over

Status
Not open for further replies.

vil

Key Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bulgarian
Home Country
Bulgaria
Current Location
Bulgaria
Dear teachers,

I know some meanings of the phrasal verb “run over” such as:

  • (a vessel or its contents ) overflow as in:
“This pot's running over.” Or "My cup runneth over [with God's bounty]." (23th Psalm)

  • run over smth. review, recapitulate
“Let’s run over our parts again. (eg when learning and rehearsing parts in a play)

  • read through quickly
“He ran over his note before starting the lecture.”

  • knock you down and drive across your body in a car
“If you cross the street in the wrong place you may get run over.”

  • Go beyond, exceed, as in
“I've run over the allotted time, but there are still questions.”

I have just written the following sentence:

“There are no buses to Withering on Sundays but I can easily run you over in the car.”

Would you be kind enough to say to me whether you know and respectively endorse the usage of the expression “run you over” with the meaning “take you there in the car”?

Thank you in advance for your efforts.

Regards.

V.
 

fromatto

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Member Type
English Teacher
Dear teachers,

I know some meanings of the phrasal verb “run over” such as:

  • (a vessel or its contents ) overflow as in:
“This pot's running over.” Or "My cup runneth over [with God's bounty]." (23th Psalm)

  • run over smth. review, recapitulate
“Let’s run over our parts again. (eg when learning and rehearsing parts in a play)

  • read through quickly
“He ran over his note before starting the lecture.”

  • knock you down and drive across your body in a car
“If you cross the street in the wrong place you may get run over.”

  • Go beyond, exceed, as in
“I've run over the allotted time, but there are still questions.”

I have just written the following sentence:

“There are no buses to Withering on Sundays but I can easily run you over in the car.”

Would you be kind enough to say to me whether you know and respectively endorse the usage of the expression “run you over” with the meaning “take you there in the car”?

Thank you in advance for your efforts.

Regards.

V.


Your sentence is correct. I can run you over there 'in a jiffy' (very quickly).
 

vil

Key Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bulgarian
Home Country
Bulgaria
Current Location
Bulgaria
Hi fromatto,

Thank you for your prompt reply as well as for yor improved version of my original sentence.

Regards.

V.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top