saw or had seen?

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nado92

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I.....him before.
saw
had seen
have seen

I prefer (saw)

what about you?
Thanks for your help
 

euncu

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***neither a teacher nor a native-speaker***

I have seen him before.
I knew I had seen him before.
I saw him before his birthday.
I saw him before the statue. (=in front of) :) This one is different of course.
 

Rover_KE

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They are all correct.

Which you choose depends on the context.

EDIT - eunco has provided context.

Rover
 

Nightmare85

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I saw him before the statue. (=in front of) :) This one is different of course.

Huh?
This surprises me...
I did not expect that before could actually be used instead of in front of.
Some Germans say it because it would be the same if you translated it directly.
(In front of = 'davor', 'vor'; Before = 'davor', 'vor')

So these sentence mean the same?
I stood in front of the statue.
I stood before the statue.

:?:

I always thought before had something to do with time, not with a position.

P.S. However,
Rover_KE did not complain, so I guess it's correct...

Cheers!
 

Rover_KE

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No complaints from me, Nightmare.

It's correct, though much less common, and rather more poetic or literary than 'in front of'.

Rover
 

emsr2d2

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"Before" is quite commonly used to describe someone standing facing an audience or a group of people.

I stand before you today to announce my candidacy for President.

These two people stand before you (or before God) today to be joined in holy matrimony. (Marriage ceremony)
 
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