Says who?

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blacknomi

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I am a bit :? with these phrases.


Who says I have to retire at 60?

A:Says who?
B:Says me, that's who.

My question:
(1)Do both phrases share similiar meanings that indicate suspicion to a certain statement or opinion?

(2)Who says + Subject + verb, can "Who says" stand along?
"Says who" is an independent senetnce, can stand along.
 

RonBee

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The phrases share similar meanings, but "Says who?" stands alone, but "Who says" does not. In either case it is a kind of challenge. "Says who?" could be restated as "Who dares to say that?"

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Says who?

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Who says I have to?

:)
 

blacknomi

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RonBee said:
The phrases share similar meanings, but "Says who?" stands alone, but "Who says" does not. In either case it is a kind of challenge. "Says who?" could be restated as "Who dares to say that?"

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Says who?

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Who says I have to?

:)

Ron, you are just wonderful! :cheers:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
I am a bit :? with these phrases.


Who says I have to retire at 60?

A:Says who?
B:Says me, that's who.

My question:
(1)Do both phrases share similiar meanings that indicate suspicion to a certain statement or opinion?

(2)Who says + Subject + verb, can "Who says" stand along?
"Says who" is an independent senetnce, can stand along.

I wouldn't say "suspicion". The phrase is argumentative. It questions the validity, propriety, or accuracy of a statement.

Who says or says who can stand alone. Both have a subject and a verb.
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
Who says or says who can stand alone. Both have a subject and a verb.

A: Says who?
B: MNY.
A: But the poet said "who says" cannot stand alone.
B: Who says!
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
Who says or says who can stand alone. Both have a subject and a verb.

A: Says who?
B: MNY.
A: But the poet said "who says" cannot stand alone.
B: Who says!
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Well, "says who" is more natural as a question because it is inverted. The other version with a question mark is also acceptable, IMO. Neither of them can be called formal language.
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
Who says or says who can stand alone. Both have a subject and a verb.

A: Says who?
B: MNY.
A: But the poet said "who says" cannot stand alone.
B: Who says!
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Well, "says who" is more natural as a question because it is inverted. The other version with a question mark is also acceptable, IMO. Neither of them can be called formal language.


Yes, Sir. <salute>

:smilecol:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
Who says or says who can stand alone. Both have a subject and a verb.

A: Says who?
B: MNY.
A: But the poet said "who says" cannot stand alone.
B: Who says!
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Well, "says who" is more natural as a question because it is inverted. The other version with a question mark is also acceptable, IMO. Neither of them can be called formal language.


Yes, Sir. <salute>

:smilecol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

RonBee

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blacknomi said:
RonBee said:
The phrases share similar meanings, but "Says who?" stands alone, but "Who says" does not. In either case it is a kind of challenge. "Says who?" could be restated as "Who dares to say that?"

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Says who?

  • A: You have to retire at 60.
    B: Who says I have to?

:)

Ron, you are just wonderful! :cheers:

:oops: Thanks. :oops:

:cheers:
 

RonBee

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Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

:)
 

blacknomi

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RonBee said:
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

:)


Ron,

Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
It is supposed to be either

Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

or

Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"

:?:
:roll:
:wink:
:shock:
 

RonBee

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blacknomi said:
RonBee said:
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

:)


Ron,

Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
It is supposed to be either

Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

or

Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"

:?:
:roll:
:wink:
:shock:

Re:
  • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=but+although.

Actually, "but although" is quite common.

:)
 

blacknomi

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RonBee said:
blacknomi said:
RonBee said:
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

:)


Ron,

Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
It is supposed to be either

Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

or

Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"

:?:
:roll:
:wink:
:shock:

Re:
  • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=but+although.

Actually, "but although" is quite common.

:)


According to
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm
To suggest a contrast that is unexpected in light of the first clause: "Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, but he still seems able to live quite comfortably."
==> It's wrong to put "but" and "although" together, or I can rewrite as "Although Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, he still seems able to live quite comfortably."


I think I understand what you mean.
==>
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" Although (I have never heard of anybody saying it), I suppose it is possible.

The red part of sentence is omitted. Is that right? :lol:



OK. Suppose I omit the sentence beginning with "Mike might be......".
==>
I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" , but I suppose it is possible.

or

Although I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?", I suppose it is possible.

Is that right?
 

RonBee

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blacknomi said:
RonBee said:
blacknomi said:
RonBee said:
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" althought I suppose it is possible.

:)


Ron,

Why do you put "but" and "although" together within a sentence?
It is supposed to be either

Mike might be technically right, I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

or

Mike might be technically right, I suppose it is possible,
but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?"

:?:
:roll:
:wink:
:shock:

Re:
  • Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" although I suppose it is possible.

I can't say that I have heard of that rule you mention, but "but" and "although" appear in separate clauses. (I corrected the spelling of although.) Technically, there should be a comma after "although", but because of the other punctuation I omitted it. As I mentioned, while they are both in the same sentence, "but" and "although" are in separate clauses, "but" starting one clause and "although" starting the other one. It is really not unusual at all. Do a Google search for "but+although" and you should find quite a few sentences like that. Go to: www.google.com. Or just go here:http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=but+although.

Actually, "but although" is quite common.

:)


According to
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/conjunctions.htm
To suggest a contrast that is unexpected in light of the first clause: "Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, but he still seems able to live quite comfortably."
==> It's wrong to put "but" and "although" together, or I can rewrite as "Although Joey lost a fortune in the stock market, he still seems able to live quite comfortably."


I think I understand what you mean.
==>
Mike might be technically right, but I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" Although (I have never heard of anybody saying it), I suppose it is possible.

The red part of sentence is omitted. Is that right? :lol:

That is a perfectly legitimate way of looking at it, but no, I didn't omit anything. Instead, I used although as a "bridge" to I suppose it is possible.



OK. Suppose I omit the sentence beginning with "Mike might be......".
==>
I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?" , but I suppose it is possible.

or

Although I have never heard of anybody saying "Who says?", I suppose it is possible.

Is that right?[/quote]

Those are perfectly good.

:D
 

blacknomi

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I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage. :cry:


Kiss goodbye to grammar. :drinking:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage. :cry:


Kiss goodbye to grammar. :drinking:

Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:
 

blacknomi

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MikeNewYork said:
blacknomi said:
I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage. :cry:


Kiss goodbye to grammar. :drinking:

Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:

Good points, there.

The "bridge" is just amazing. It conncects 3 independent clauses tightly.

Thanks, dear Mike and Ron! :smilecol:
 

MikeNewYork

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blacknomi said:
MikeNewYork said:
blacknomi said:
I understood the meaning of your previous reply, I was just being picky about the grammatical structure. Sometimes I find myself confined in a grammar cage. :cry:


Kiss goodbye to grammar. :drinking:

Not so fast! The original sentence has three independent clauses, not just two. Therefore, the two conjunctions connect clause one to clause two and then clause two to clause three. That is the grammatical explanation for the use. :wink:

Good points, there.

The "bridge" is just amazing. It conncects 3 independent clauses tightly.

Thanks, dear Mike and Ron! :smilecol:

You're very welcome. :cheers:
 
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