Sentence help

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jack

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Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not why?

1. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kinds of chocolate bars I ate earlier.
2. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kinds of chocolate bar I ate earlier.

3. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kind of chocolate bars I ate earlier.
4. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kind of chocolate bar I ate earlier.

5. He dies more then he can kill. (This is correct.)
6. He dies more then he kills. (Is this correct? Does it make sense? What does this mean? )
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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You will here 1&2 being used. 'Kinds'should definitely beplural,though there will be different views about 'bar'. 5&6 don't make senseto me. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
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Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.
So what do these mean?
1. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kinds of chocolate bars I ate earlier.
2. I feel sick. I think it is from the different kinds of chocolate bar I ate earlier.

3. I made some cakes but they’re all burnt. ( I understand what this means).
4. I made some cakes but it is all burnt. ( Is this incorrect?)
5. I made some cake but it is all burnt. ( correct?)
6. I made some foods but they’re all burnt. ( Is this correct? What does this mean?).
7. I made some food but they’re all burnt. ( Is this correct? What does this mean?).
8. I made some Italian foods but they’re all burnt. ( Is this correct? What does this mean?).
9. I made some Italian food but they’re all burnt. ( Is this correct? What does this mean?).
10. I made some Italian food but it is all burnt. ( Is this correct? What does this mean?).

Are these correct? What do they mean?
11. I want some more food.
12. I want some more foods.
13. I want some more Italian food.
14. I want some more Italian foods.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, how can I correct these?

1. There is a boy and a girl.
2. There are a boy and a girl.
3. There are a debit and a visa machine.

Are these right? They don't sound so good, how can I make it sound better?
4. What did you call me for today?
5. What did you call me for, for today?
 

Casiopea

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1. There is a boy[/u and (there is) a girl sitting over there.
3. There is a debit machine and (there is) a visa machine around the corner.

Why did you call me today?
For what reason did you call (me) today?

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I saw this movie title but I don't understan it.

Are these correct? If not, why?
1. The lady killer. (Saying someone is a lady killer?
2. The Ladykillers (What does this mean?)

3. She is a man hater. (What does this mean?)
4. She is a men hater. (What does this mean?)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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Are these correct? If not, why?
1. The lady killer. (Saying someone is a lady killer?
2. The Ladykillers (What does this mean?)

a 'ladykiller' is a man who is very attractive to women. The film title plays on this word as it is about men trying to kill a woman.

3. She is a man hater. (What does this mean?)
This one is correct. It simply means that she doesn't like men.
4. She is a men hater. (What does this mean?)

;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Thanks.
Why is this incorrect?

1. She is a men hater. (What does this mean?)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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We wouldn't use the plural there.;-)
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Can you tell me what does it mean? So I can understand why it is wrong.

She is a men hater.

'men' functions as an adjective. It tells us what kind of 'hater'.

Note, the noun 'hater' comes from the verb hate + -er, like teach -> teacher, build -> builder. When -er is added to a verb, the result is a noun that means, a person who_____. For example, a man-hater is a person who hates men.

Why a singular adjective, you ask? Well, adjectives don't take number; that property belongs to nouns. :wink:

man-hater (adjective+noun)
woman-beater (adjective+noun) i.e., a person who beats up women.

All the best,
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct?

1. All wheel drive. (How come this is correct?)
2. All wheel drives.
3. All wheels drive.
 
N

Natalie27

Guest
jack said:
Are these correct?

1. All wheel drive. (How come this is correct?)
2. All wheel drives. (not OK)
3. All wheels drive.
(not OK)

"All wheel drive" is a feature on the car relating to the wheels. (abbr. 4WD)
by reading previous posts by Cas and Tdol I am guessing that "all wheel" functions as an adjective describing the noun "drive".
Drive means an automotive system in which mechanical power is going from the engine to all four wheels.

:lol:
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Are these correct?

1. All wheel drive. (How come this is correct?)
2. All wheel drives.
3. All wheels drive.

Natalie has it. :up:

1. an all-wheel drive (OK)
=> The car is driven by all the wheels.

Adjective Test
Q: What kind of drive does the car have?
A: It has an all-wheel drive ~ a four-wheel drive.

Note that, the hyphen (-) tells us that 'all' and 'wheel' function as a unit.

2. All wheel drives (Not OK)
=> All of the wheels drive the car.
"All" is plural so its object "wheel" should also be plural: All wheels.

Note that, "All" and "wheels" do not functions as a unit, per se. The words 'of the' have been omitted. In other words, a hyphen is not required.

3. All wheels drive the car. (OK)

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct? If not, why? What do these mean?
1. Back to my 40hrs of work a week.
2. Back to work of 40hrs a week.

3. Back to my 40hrs a week of work
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
1. Back to my 40hr work week. (Is the bold part the adjective? So that's why '40hr' is not '40hrs'?
2. Back to my 40hrs a week job. (How does it work here? What does '40hrs' fucntion as?)

3. Is the bold part the adjective? (Can 'bold' take -ed?)
4. Is the bolded part the adjective? (If this is incorrect, why? Even if I'm talking about past tense, I can't add -ed to 'bold'?)
 

Casiopea

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Adjectives
1. Back to my 40hr work week.
2. Back to my 40hrs a week job. (Synonymous with 40hrs per week)
3. Is the bold part the adjective? :-D
4. Is the bolded part the adjective? :-(

'bold' is already an adjective in form, so don't add -ed.
 
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