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jack

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In one SENTENCE define / explain the following (sentence = subject + predicate):

A) Epicenter

ans:
The part of the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake.

Does my ans have a subject and a predicate?
 

jack

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(directly above the focus of an earthquake) <---is this the predicate?


The part of the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake.
is "earth's surface" the subject? What is a easy way to determine the subject and the verb in a sentence?
 

jack

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Thanks Milky, very useful link.

"The epicenter is the part of the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake. "

Subject = epicenter
Verb = is
correct?
 

Tdol

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The subject is 'epicenter', the verb is 'is' and the predicate is the verb + everything else. ;-)
 

jack

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He is killed. <--"he" is the subject and "is" is the verb, what is "killed" called in that sentence?
 

Tdol

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The verb consists of two words:

is (auxiliary verb) + killed (past participle)

They combine. ;-)
 

jack

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He acts as if he _______ the coolest guy in school.
a) is
b) was
c) were

The answer is C.

Why is "a" wrong?? and what is wrong with "b"?


After working on my car all evening, I finally _______ down to sleep at around midnight.
a) laid
b) lied
c) lay

The answer is C.

Why is A wrong?
 

RonBee

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jack said:
He acts as if he _______ the coolest guy in school.
a) is
b) was
c) were

The answer is C.

Why is "a" wrong?? and what is wrong with "b"?

In my humble opinion, they are all wrong. That is because it is not idiomatic English. More likely:
  • He acts as if he thinks he is the coolest guy in school.


jack said:
After working on my car all evening, I finally _______ down to sleep at around midnight.
a) laid
b) lied
c) lay

The answer is C.

Why is A wrong?

It can't be "laid" because that would have to take a direct object. Example:
  • I laid it down.

:)
 

Francois

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Why is "a" wrong?? and what is wrong with "b"?
Subjunctive mood. This is similar to "If I were you, I would not do it". a) is present simple and doesn't say that the phrase is hypothetical. b) is incorrect but you might see it sometimes (that's a mistake).

Why is A wrong?
'lay' is the past simple of 'lie' here (but the verb 'lay' also exist). The phrasal verb is "lie down'.

FRC
 

jack

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After working on my car all evening, I finally _______ down to sleep at around midnight.
a) laid
b) lied
c) lay

The answer is C.

Why is A wrong?


It can't be "laid" because that would have to take a direct object. Example:

I laid it down.



I laid down to sleep at around midnight. <--this is a direct object, so why is "laid" wrong?
 

Francois

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I laid down to sleep at around midnight. <--this is a direct object, so why is "laid" wrong?
I don't think there's a direct object here. If there were one, it would be the answer to the question 'What did I lay down' ? You obviously cannot answer 'to sleep', as it would be the anwser to 'why'.
Again, here the verb is lie/lay/lain (not lay/laid/laid).

FRC
 

henry

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Francois said:
Subjunctive mood. This is similar to "If I were you, I would not do it". a) is present simple and doesn't say that the phrase is hypothetical. b) is incorrect but you might see it sometimes (that's a mistake).

I wouldn't go so far to say that 'as if' is only used in subjunctive mood.

'as if or as though ' means in a way that suggests something.

Let's have a look closer.

(a) It looks like rain.
(b) It looks as if it is going to rain.
(c) It looks as though it is going to rain.
(d) It looks like it is going to rain.(informal)

They all have the same meaning and suggest in a way that it is going to rain.

But as if/ as though can state an untrue statement, as in (e):

(e) He is not a child. She talked to him as if he were a child.

He acts as if he _______ the coolest guy in school.
a) is
b) was
c) were

In this case, the best answer would be 'were' because the sentence indicates somehow that the fact 'his being the coolest guy in the school' is not true.

:wink:
 

RonBee

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Say:
  • Let's have a closer look.

:)
 

henry

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Francois said:
I wouldn't go so far to say that 'as if' is only used in subjunctive mood.
I didn't mean to say that. I probably wasn't very clear.

FRC

Hi Comment ça va, FRC?

OK. I do want to take it back. You not angry? :)


:cheers:
 

RonBee

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henry said:
RonBee said:
Say:
  • Let's have a closer look.

:)

Oops! and Thank You :D

Hi my old Ron, How you doing? :)

I'm okay, and I'm not old yet. :wink:

Did you know that they shoot off firecrackers for my birthday? (Okay, not really. The date actually has a bit more historical significance than that.)

:wink:
 

MikeNewYork

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jack said:
He acts as if he _______ the coolest guy in school.
a) is
b) was
c) were

The answer is C.

Why is "a" wrong?? and what is wrong with "b"?

As others have indicated, C is correct. It is the subjunctive and is used to indicate that the speaker considers the "act" to be contrary to fact. Normally, we don't use the present tense or the past indicative in that construction.
 
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