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I have a confussion between complex and compound sentence.
 

Casiopea

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vane_cita27@hotmail.com said:
I have a confussion between complex and compound sentence.

A compound sentence is when two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction: and, but, or, for, yet, so

EX: I like coffee, and he likes tea.
EX: I like coffee, but I don't like latte.
EX: Does she like coffee, or does she like tea?
EX: I like coffee, so I am going to order a coffee.
EX: I like coffee, yet I think I will order tea instead.

A compound sentence is made up of two independent clauses:

1) I like coffee. (independent clause)
2) He likes tea. (independent clause)
=> I like coffee, and he likes tea. (compound sentence)

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Depedent clauses begin with a subordinating conjunction,

after
although
as
as if
as long as
as though
because
before
even if
even though
if
if only
in order that
now that
once
rather than
since
so that
than
that
though
till
unless
until
when
whenever
where
whereas
wherever
while

Only complex sentence have dependent clauses. Dependent clauses begin with a subordinating conjunction:

EX: After she left, I did the dishes.
EX: When you go to the store, could you pick up some milk?
EX: He wants me work because he needs extra people.
EX: Could you show me so that I can understand?

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause,

1) After she left. (dependent clause. It begins with "After", a subordinator)
2) I did the dishes. (independent clause)
==> After she left, I did the dishes. (complex sentence)
==> I did the dishes, after she left. (complex sentence)

There are also complex-compound sentences:

After she left, Mary went to sleep and I did the dishes.

1) After she left. (Dependent clause)
2) Mary went to sleep. (Independent clause)
3) I did the dishes. (Independent clause)

Note that, the subordinating conjunction "After" tells us that "After she left" is a dependent clause, and that the co-ordinating conjunction "and" tells us that there are two independent clauses.

All the best, :D
 
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