Sentences often found in official documents

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Piak

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Dear Sirs,

It is because I haven't seen any questions that I posted on the Forum twice a couple of days before, I therefore post those again. Please help correct them for me.

Are these sentences correct English?
!. Father and mother have not registered their marriage with each other yet. Or
2. Father and mother did not get their marriage registered with each other yet.
3. They lived together as husband and wife to each other without getting the marriage registered.

Thank you
Piak
 
A

Anonymous

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Piak said:
Dear Sirs,

It is because I haven't seen any questions that I posted on the Forum twice a couple of days before, I therefore post those again. Please help correct them for me.

Are these sentences correct English?
!. Father and mother have not registered their marriage with each other yet. Or
2. Father and mother did not get their marriage registered with each other yet.
3. They lived together as husband and wife to each other without getting the marriage registered.

Thank you
Piak



Are these sentences correct English?
1. Father and mother have not registered their marriage with each other yet. <

I would not use "each other" here. I would write it like this: Father and mother have not registered their marriage yet.

This sentence is grammatically correct, though I have not heard of "registering a marriage". Grammatically, the sentence is fine.


2. Father and mother did not get their marriage registered with each other yet. <

I would not use "each other" here. It's not necessary because we know that "father and mother" can only get their marriage registered "with each other". Using "each other" is awkward sounding and I'd also say it is redundant in some way.

For informal speaking "yet" is some times used with the simple past. Many people would argue that we should not use "yet" with the simple past at all. To be safe, you are better off staying with the first sentence. Native speakers of English might use a sentence like this from time to time. It is really a usage isssue in my opinion. You would do better to stay with the first sentence.

Here is a definition of "yet" and a usage note. Take a look at the usage note. It basically says what I just said here. http://www.bartleby.com/61/97/Y0019700.html


3. They lived together as husband and wife to each other without getting the marriage registered. <

I would leave out "to each other". We know that this relationship is reciprocal already without using "each other".

I recommend writing the sentence like this: They lived together as husband and wife without getting the marriage registered.

Once again, I have not heard of "registering a marriage", but the sentence is grammatically correct. I would just say "without getting married".

........................................................
It is because I haven't seen any questions that I posted on the Forum twice a couple of days before, I therefore post those again. Please help correct them for me. <

From what I understand, there were some technical difficulties with the forum. This should be all set now.
 

Tdol

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In British English, the past tense would be very unlikely. I agree with CitySpeak about the use of 'each other'. :)
 

MikeNewYork

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Piak said:
Dear Sirs,

It is because I haven't seen any questions that I posted on the Forum twice a couple of days before, I therefore post those again. Please help correct them for me.

Are these sentences correct English?
!. Father and mother have not registered their marriage with each other yet. Or
2. Father and mother did not get their marriage registered with each other yet.
3. They lived together as husband and wife to each other without getting the marriage registered.

Thank you
Piak

I agree with the others about "each other". It sounds as if these sentences are describing what is caled "common law" marriage in the United States. Two people who live openly as husband and wife (both parties agreeing) can be considered married without having been officially married in a legal ceremony.
 

vvaann

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When a young couple go(es) to a legal institution for being officially considered married, what do you call that action if not "register"? I find it difficult to take an appropriate word here.
BTW, a couple take(s) a singular or plural verb form? :lol:
Thank you!
 

Tdol

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A couple can be singular or plural/ The place is a registry office, but the verb is still 'marry'. :shock:
 

MikeNewYork

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vvaann said:
When a young couple go(es) to a legal institution for being officially considered married, what do you call that action if not "register"? I find it difficult to take an appropriate word here.
BTW, a couple take(s) a singular or plural verb form? :lol:
Thank you!

Couple is usually singular in American English.
 

Tdol

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Mike is right- I was speaking from a BE perspective, where both forms are common. :D
 
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