set the faucet tight?

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zhengl_2000

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Did u set the faucet tight? Is this right?

Can I say: did u turn off the water tightly?
 
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christea

Guest
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.
 
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Susie Smith

Guest
twostep said:
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

Neither have I. :wink:
 
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zhengl_2000

Guest
I heard it from my apartment manager, California

Susie Smith said:
twostep said:
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

Neither have I. :wink:

*****************
Are you two American?
If yes, it is weird.
If not, you really need to keep learning English.
I asked this question because American used it.
 
S

Susie Smith

Guest
Re: I heard it from my apartment manager, California

zhengl_2000 said:
Susie Smith said:
twostep said:
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

Neither have I. :wink:

*****************
Are you two American?
If yes, it is weird.
If not, you really need to keep learning English.
I asked this question because American used it.

Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough. :lol:
 
Z

zhengl_2000

Guest
your answer

Susie Smith said:
zhengl_2000 said:
Susie Smith said:
twostep said:
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

Neither have I. :wink:

*****************
Are you two American?
If yes, it is weird.
If not, you really need to keep learning English.
I asked this question because American used it.

Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough. :lol:


Would you please give me the answer, the way you say it?
I would appreciate it if you let me know the correct American way to say
"turn off the faucet tightly".
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
Re: your answer

zhengl_2000 said:
Susie Smith said:
zhengl_2000 said:
Susie Smith said:
twostep said:
christea said:
The first example you give is written in American English. The second example is written in very precise and therefore correct English as written in the UK.

I have never heard of setting faucets tight in context with turning off water.

Neither have I. :wink:

*****************
Are you two American?
If yes, it is weird.
If not, you really need to keep learning English.
I asked this question because American used it.

Why do you think it's weird? I'm an American and I don't think it's weird at all. :D I didn't say that it was wrong. I merely agreed with twostep. The fact that a person has heard or hasn't heard an expression doesn't make it right or wrong. It's a big country and people in different regions often have different ways of saying things. A lot of native speakers make glaring mistakes, btw.
It was my first time to hear "set" used in that sense. I set a faucet every day. When I do that, I am adjusting or regulating the flow or temperature of the water. I don't use "set" in the sense of "turn off", but some people might.
Yes, I will keep on learning English. I always loved my English classes when I was a girl and I still enjoy studying this language, but of one thing I'm certain, I will never learn enough. :lol:


Would you please give me the answer, the way you say it?
I would appreciate it if you let me know the correct American way to say
"turn off the faucet tightly".

You can turn the water off. "turn off the faucet tightly" makes no sense. Try using common sense - there is nothing you can turn off. The faucet is set securely in the sink. What is in motion and can be manipulated is water.

PS -

Are you two American? I am not.
If yes, it is weird. Why?
If not, you really need to keep learning English. To each his own.
I asked this question because American used it. There are apples and oranges.
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
Francois said:
Looks like there's some faucet flame upcoming ;)

FRC

I missed you! Well, in Alabama we do not have to worry about faucets. Being considered a developing country we still go to the well. :wink:
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
We have 'taps' not 'faucets' in the UK.;-)
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
tdol said:
We have 'taps' not 'faucets' in the UK.;-)

Here they pley taps but not on faucets. :wink:
Funny - it is called tap water but comes out of faucets.
 
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