should

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
He should have brought that car.
You should have brought that car.


I can say "he had brought that car."
Why can't i say he should had brought that car.


If i am talking to someone do i say: ""he had brought that car." or do i say "he have brought that car." when would i use have and had?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
He should have brought that car.
You should have brought that car.


I can say "he had brought that car."
Why can't i say he should had brought that car.


If i am talking to someone do i say: ""he had brought that car." or do i say "he have brought that car." when would i use have and had?

1. He has recently bought that car.
2. He had bought that car before the loan came through.

:D
 

henry

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
jack said:
He should have brought that car.
You should have brought that car.


I can say "he had brought that car."
Why can't i say he should had brought that car.


If i am talking to someone do i say: ""he had brought that car." or do i say "he have brought that car." when would i use have and had?

#"He/You should have brought that car" means that he/you didn't manage to bring that car at the needed time.

It's a conditional sentence which is formed by "should/could/might+have+past participle."

2# Yes, " he had brought that car" is a past perfect tense.
But you can't say " he should had brought that car" because as above explained there should be " have" regardless of the subjects.

Hope that helps.
:D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I am still a bit vague on this had and have, lets say someone asked me this"

"Have you brought that car yet?" <--is thie question correct
or should it be
"have you buy that car yet? <--if this is correct, then how do i know which on to use, can you give me a scenario if you can.

Do i say:
Yes i have.
or
Yes i had. <--this doesn't work unless i have another pass event right?

or
Yes i have, but that was quite a while ago.
or
Yes i had, I had brought it last week. or is it Yes i have, I had brought it last week
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
He should have brought that car.
You should have brought that car.


I can say "he had brought that car."
Why can't i say he should had brought that car.

I'm not sure whether you are talking about "brought" (past tense/past participle of "bring") or "bought" (past tense/past participle of "buy"). You switched to "buy" later.

"He/you should have bought that car" uses the modal auxiliary verb "should" to indicate "advice". The "have" part puts in the past tense. Present tense would be "you should buy that car".

When you use the past perfect "had bought", you are taking about a purchase that was made prior to some other past event. "He had bought that car before he moved to Arizona." We can't use "should" there because "had" is not used with "should" to create a past tense.

If i am talking to someone do i say: ""he had brought that car." or do i say "he have brought that car." when would i use have and had?

You can't use "have" with "he". The third person singular verb form is "has". You can use "has bought" or "had bought", but in different circumstances. You should do some reading on perfect tenses:

https://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/perfect.html

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/esltensverb.html

http://www.grammarmudge.cityslide.com/articles/article/1029424/8972.htm

http://grammar.englishclub.com/verb-tenses.htm
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
henry said:
#"He/You should have brought that car" means that he/you didn't manage to bring that car at the needed time.

It's a conditional sentence which is formed by "should/could/might+have+past participle."

Henry, that is not a conditional sentence. It is a sentence with a modal auxiliary verb. Only some of those are conditional. :wink:
 

henry

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
MikeNewYork said:
henry said:
#"He/You should have brought that car" means that he/you didn't manage to bring that car at the needed time.

It's a conditional sentence which is formed by "should/could/might+have+past participle."

Henry, that is not a conditional sentence. It is a sentence with a modal auxiliary verb. Only some of those are conditional. :wink:

:oops:
Thanks Mike. :D

I was quite long remote from grammer.

:D
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
henry said:
MikeNewYork said:
henry said:
#"He/You should have brought that car" means that he/you didn't manage to bring that car at the needed time.

It's a conditional sentence which is formed by "should/could/might+have+past participle."

Henry, that is not a conditional sentence. It is a sentence with a modal auxiliary verb. Only some of those are conditional. :wink:

:oops:
Thanks Mike. :D

I was quite long remote from grammer.

No problem, Henry. That's why we're here. :wink:

:D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
What do these mean?

1. Should my system be fine? (I want to ask someone if my system is going to be fine in the future. Is this correct? Isn't 'should' past tense?)
2. Is my system fine?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
What do these mean?

1. Should my system be fine? (I want to ask someone if my system is going to be fine in the future. Is this correct? Isn't 'should' past tense?)
2. Is my system fine?

Use "Will" to express certainty:

Will my system be fine? (i.e., Yes or No?)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
But this is not wrong right? Why does this work though? Isn't 'should' past tense?
1. Should my system be fine?

Is this correct?
2. You should max out the time with your love ones before it is too late. (Is this talking about the future? Why? Isn't 'should' past tense?)

Does this mean more then one time? Does it make more sense to use 'times' since you love more then one person, which means you should max out more then one time?
3. You should max out the times with your love ones before it is too late. (Is this talking about the future? Why? Isn't 'should' past tense?)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
But this is not wrong right? Why does this work though? Isn't 'should' past tense?
1. Should my system be fine?

In that context 'should' means, likelihood. It's a modal. :wink: In 2., modal 'should' expresses a suggestion.

2. You should max out the time with your love ones before it is too late. :D

3. You should max out the times with your love ones before it is too late. :(
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
In that context 'should' means, likelihood. It's a modal. In 2., modal 'should' expresses a suggestion.

What's a modal? I have looked it up, but I don't really understand the meaning. Could you explain it to me? Thanks.

1. I should have read this book. (Does this mean I should have read that book?)
2. I should read this book. (What does this mean? How come it is not in past tense? This is a suggestion?)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
1. Mazda Dealer will take care of them should a problem arise. (Is this correct? How come this doesn't sound right to me?)
2. Mazda Dealer will take care of them if a problem arise. (correct?)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
1. Mazda Dealer will take care of them should a problem arise. (Is this correct? How come this doesn't sound right to me?)
2. Mazda Dealer will take care of them if a problem arise. (correct?)

I believe they are synonymous:

should (some unexpected) problem (happen to) arise

if a problem arise
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
should ([/u]some unexpected) [/u] problem (happen to) arise
Why it isn't like this:
1. Should some unexpected problems arise. (Isn't 'problem' countable?)

Why this is incorrect?
2. You should max out the times with your love ones before it is too late. (Why is it incorrect with 'times'?)
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
jack said:
Why isn't it like this:
1. Should some unexpected problems arise. (Isn't 'problem' countable?)

Why is this incorrect?
2. You should max out the times with your love ones before it is too late. (Why is it incorrect with 'times'?)

1. 'some' can express (a) an unknown number or (b) an unknown kind:

(a) Should some problems arise.... (OK; an unknown number, plural)
(b) Should some problem arise... (OK; an unknown kind, singular)

2. 'time' refers to Time itself, a thing: a period.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top