Simple question

Status
Not open for further replies.

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
I'm bouncin, ta ta.


Here are my wild guess,
I'm still alive, he he.
I'm here and there. But bye for now.


What does that mean? :wink:
 

Mister Micawber

Key Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
Japan
'Ta ta' means good-bye, so I would think 'I'm bouncing' means simply 'I'm leaving'.
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Thanks, MM.

Bye is a short for bye-bye
Is "ta" a short for ta-ta?

:D
 

Mister Micawber

Key Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2004
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
Japan
'Ta' on the other hand usually means 'thanks', I believe, but we should wait for a Brit to advise us-- it is a definite Briticism.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
And 'ta-ta' does mean goodbye.
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Thank you, MM, shane and tdol.

Do British adults prefer to say "ta-ta" or "bye"? TDOL? Red? shane?
Do American say "ta-ta" once in a while or all the time? MM? Cass?


I think it depends but I would like to know your preference.


Something interesting from Dictionary.com
Word History: No doubt more than one reader has wondered exactly how goodbye is derived from the phrase “God be with you.” To understand this, it is helpful to see earlier forms of the expression, such as God be wy you, god b'w'y, godbwye, god buy' ye, and good-b'wy. The first word of the expression is now good and not God, for good replaced God by analogy with such expressions as good day, perhaps after people no longer had a clear idea of the original sense of the expression. A letter of 1573 written by Gabriel Harvey contains the first recorded use of goodbye: “To requite your gallonde [gallon] of godbwyes, I regive you a pottle of howdyes,” recalling another contraction that is still used.


godbwye for now. :lol:
 

blacknomi

Key Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2004
Member Type
Student or Learner
Do British adults prefer to say "ta-ta" or "bye"? TDOL? Red? shane?

Adults?! :shock: No offense here. Everytime when I come across these double-structured words, such as coo-coo, ta-ta, num-num, poo-poo and son on, I would say it sometimes but in a more cuty way. :wink:
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I wouldn't use 'ta-ta' and I see exactly what you mean. I don't here it used very much in London. It might be more common in other regions. 'Ta' is widely used. ;-)
 

shane

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
When I was young, my dad always used to say 'ta-ta' when saying goodbye to his friends. He always pronounced it 'ta-da' though. ;)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Where was he from? I heard it as a childin the midlands, which is why I wondered if it was regional.;-)
 

shane

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
tdol said:
Where was he from? I heard it as a childin the midlands, which is why I wondered if it was regional.;-)

We hail from Watford. ;)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I'd use it informally- if Red makes me a coffee, say, I'd use it.;-)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top