since I'm not an expert

AirbusA321

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Which of these sentences are correct and which would you favor?

You better don't rely on me...

1 ...for I'm not an expert.
2 ...for me not being an expert.
3 ...due to me not being an expert.
4 ...due to the fact that I'm not an expert.
5 ...since I'm not an expert.
6 ...hence I'm not an expert.
7 ...forwhy I'm not an expert.
8 ...inasmuch as I'm not an expert.
9 ...as I'm not an expert.
10 ...seeing as/that I'm not an expert.
11 ...whereas I'm not an expert.

I'm aware that most people would probably use "because" but I'm trying to find alternatives.
 

emsr2d2

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Until the first half of the sentence is grammatically correct, there is no point picking a second half.

"You better don't rely on me ..." is wrong. Try rewriting it.
 

AirbusA321

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Maybe "You better don't take my advice for granted..."?
 

Rover_KE

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emsr2d2

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Here's a clue. The third word is wrong. You need a different word there. (Some people will also say that the first word should be "You'd" but the version with "You" is commonly heard.)
 

Polyester

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2 ...for me not being an expert.

Teacher,
I don't understand what is the meaning of underlined in red.
 

Rover_KE

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Polyester, this is AirbusA321's question.

Please wait until it has been dealt with before asking supplementary questions.
 

AirbusA321

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Google says that "You better don't" is considered poor style in most variants of English and should be shortened to "You better not". ("You better don't" would sound more logical to me but that's just my petty personal opinion as a non-native English speaker.)
 

Tdol

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You('d) better not sounds better to my BrE ear, and I would make sure to use had in most contexts. Logic doesn't hold much sway with grammatical questions of right and wrong, I'm afraid.
 

GoesStation

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Google says that "You better don't" is considered poor style in most variants of English ....
It's not just poor style. It's incorrect and unnatural.
 

AirbusA321

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Am I right that number 1,5,6 and 9 from my list are often heard in everyday talk and the other ones maybe not so much?
 

Tdol

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No- 1 is not common, and mostly wrong. 5 & 6 don't mean the same.
 

GoesStation

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Numbers 5, 9, and 10 look natural to me. The rest range from unlikely ("for" is rarely used this way in AmE) to impossible (where did you find the word forwhy​?).
 

AirbusA321

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Numbers 5, 9, and 10 look natural to me. The rest range from unlikely ("for" is rarely used this way in AmE) to impossible (where did you find the word forwhy​?).

It's listed in online dictionaries (e.g. here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/forwhy) and I think it sounds very nice, so I'm not too happy to hear that most people don't seem to use it, though it has at least 343,000 google hits.
 

emsr2d2

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Google hits aren't a great way of checking grammatical correctness or accuracy.
 
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