slash or forward slash?

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japanjapan

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Dear teachers,
How should I call these two signs:
"/" "\"

which one is "slash"? Which one is "forward slash"?

Maybe their names have nothing to do with the word "slash", then what are they?

thanks
 

MikeNewYork

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japanjapan said:
Dear teachers,
How should I call these two signs:
"/" "\"

which one is "slash"? Which one is "forward slash"?

Maybe their names have nothing to do with the word "slash", then what are they?

thanks

I know of no use for the backslash in English. That is computerese, IMO.

:wink:
 

japanjapan

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MikeNewYork said:
japanjapan said:
Dear teachers,
How should I call these two signs:
"/" "\"

which one is "slash"? Which one is "forward slash"?

Maybe their names have nothing to do with the word "slash", then what are they?

thanks

I know of no use for the backslash in English. That is computerese, IMO.

:wink:

Your advice is very helpful, I looked up the word" backslash" and figured out the question.

"/" is called forward slash
"\" is called backslash.

thanks.
 

Tdol

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If someone just says 'slash', I'd take they meant /. ;-)
 

Tdol

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BTW What is '|' called? ;-)
 

japanjapan

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tdol said:
BTW What is '|' called? ;-)

nice question!
I wanna know it too.
:lol:
 

shane

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In web design, I believe it is called 'pipe'.

From www.info.borland.com :

Use the pipe character, '|', to denote the caret position in the expanded template.

;)
 

Tdol

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Does '¬' have a name? ;-)
 

Tdol

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I don't its name or its use. ;-(
 

MikeNewYork

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shane said:
tdol said:
I don't its name or its use. ;-(

I've seen it used as a nose in a smiley:

:¬ )

So there you go. It is now a smiley nose. :wink:
 

Tdol

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It's a 'not'symbol, apparently, so it's ¬ a nose. ;¬)
 
M

mrgoh

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it looks like to me "giyeok" in hangeul alphabet, which is letter of korean.
the vertical part of the symbol should be a bit longer though.

and here's the exact "giyeok" -----

BTW how do you say "*" button on the phone?
sometimes it's been annoying me after i forgot the name.
 

Tdol

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In British English we call * the star button and # is hash. I don't know if Americans have different words, but I'm sure someone will let us know. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
In British English we call * the star button and # is hash. I don't know if Americans have different words, but I'm sure someone will let us know. ;-)

In North American English, # is called pound. The pound key or the pound button. It took me forever to figure that one out after a recorded message had said, "Now press the pound key". Huh? I ended up calling the operator and asking, "Excuse me, :oops: could you tell me what the pound key looks like, please?" :lol:
 

Tdol

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It doesn't look anything like a £. ;-)
 

Tdol

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So it should be €. ;-)
 
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mrgoh

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tdol said:
So it should be €. ;-)

I usually say sharp button for #, which somehow has hardly caused confusion.
Well, now I'm wondering how should I say for it. :( :wink:
 
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