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GUEST2008

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Hi

Should it be: She sleeps calm or She sleeps calmly.

thanks
 

proof.beh

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Hi

Should it be: She sleeps calm or She sleeps calmly.

thanks

The word Calm only used to be one of these: V, N or Adj that it would not be including adverb one! So In sentence "She sleeps calmly" the writer describes 'how she sleeps' by using an adverb (Calm+ly) that can be looked upon as the qualifier word i.e. 'calmly'!
 
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GUEST2008

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Hi

I asked this question because I wanted to compare:

1. She looks nice (not: nicely)
2. She sleeps calmly.

In the first example adjective is the correct option, and in the second example the adverb is the correct option, despite the fact that both "looks" and "sleeps" are verbs.
 

proof.beh

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Hi

I asked this question because I wanted to compare:

1. She looks nice (not: nicely)
2. She sleeps calmly.

In the first example adjective is the correct option, and in the second example the adverb is the correct option, despite the fact that both "looks" and "sleeps" are verbs.

Evidently, you have to draw an attention to the significances of both sentences you wrote! If we want to speak about these types of sentences with an adj or adv then that will need a long time just to write all one by one and then elaborating any of them!

As adverb nicely is Standard, meaning “well, satisfactorily, acceptably, appropriately”: She was nicely dressed. He thanked his grandmother nicely. As adjective in predicate adjective position, nicely is at best dialectal: She looks nicely. Use nice instead. But compare

If "nicely" was used instead of nice in the first sentence, it means She is a good-looking girl! But when "nice" replaces with nicely, it will be giving a completely different meaning from the former one so that She is supposed to be a nice guy whether it'd be true or not!
 

GUEST2008

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If "nicely" was used instead of nice in the first sentence, it means She is a good-looking girl! But when "nice" replaces with nicely, it will be giving a completely different meaning from the former one so that She is supposed to be a nice guy whether it'd be true or not!

Are you sure? I would say that: She looks nicely would mean that the way she looks at me or at something else is just nice, so she looks at the things in a nice way.

On the other hand: She looks nice, in my opinion, would mean that she is a nice girl or she is nicely dressed or something else, her appearance is just nice, and it has nothing to do with the way she looks at something like in the first example.

That's how I see it!
 

banderas

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Are you sure? I would say that: She looks nicely would mean that the way she looks at me or at something else is just nice, so she looks at the things in a nice way.

On the other hand: She looks nice, in my opinion, would mean that she is a nice girl or she is nicely dressed or something else, her appearance is just nice, and it has nothing to do with the way she looks at something like in the first example.

That's how I see it!
can you chalange:

feel bad and
feel badly?;-)
 

engee30

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can you chalange:

feel bad :tick: (= feel ill) and
feel badly? :cross:;-)

Years ago, you could say I feel badly meaning I feel ill, or She looks nicely meaning She looks the way it makes her attractive. Modern English allows us to use only adjectives with linking verbs (feel, look, etc).
:cool:
 

banderas

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Years ago, you could say I feel badly meaning I feel ill, or She looks nicely meaning She looks the way it makes her attractive. Modern English allows us to use only adjectives with linking verbs (feel, look, etc).
:cool:

is "feel badly" always incorrect appart from the meaning: "feel ill"?
 

Barb_D

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If "nicely" was used instead of nice in the first sentence, it means She is a good-looking girl! But when "nice" replaces with nicely, it will be giving a completely different meaning from the former one so that She is supposed to be a nice guy whether it'd be true or not!

I'm sorry, but you are not using the rule correctly.

There are a number of verbs (seem, look, feel, appear, and of course, is) that link to an adjective that describes the subject, not to an adverb that describes how the verb is accomplished.

Compare She looked eager with She looked eagerly inside the box that she knew contained her present.

In the first, looked is used to describe the girl. In the second, it's actually an "active" verb, and her act of seeking was done in an eager manner.
 

proof.beh

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I'm sorry, but you are not using the rule correctly.

There are a number of verbs (seem, look, feel, appear, and of course, is) that link to an adjective that describes the subject, not to an adverb that describes how the verb is accomplished.

Compare She looked eager with She looked eagerly inside the box that she knew contained her present.

In the first, looked is used to describe the girl. In the second, it's actually an "active" verb, and her act of seeking was done in an eager manner.


You know I was thinking of this matter from another side that was precisely corresponding to the usage of an adjective (i.e. nice) after look also its adverb form, nicely.

If one says she looks nice, (as I said) that will be closest to "describing an adjective related to girl's facial expression" in the same meaning of she really regards nicely not in the meaning of verb seem instead of look. I think that was a misunderstanding! Now it can be my mistake and you are able to correct it!

About she looks nicely, I think, that satisfies everyone to see in a way that is being interesting and good when in the mood. I mean, if I got the true knowledge about it, everybody can look elegantly but what if he/she doesn't be so, turely?

And finally the sentence she looked eagerly... has made the same use of she looks nicely, albeit she wouldn't be eager in her heart about what she saw in the box!
 

Barb_D

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If one says she looks nice, (as I said) that will be closest to "describing an adjective related to girl's facial expression" in the same meaning of she really regards nicely not in the meaning of verb seem instead of look. I think that was a misunderstanding! Now it can be my mistake and you are able to correct it!

No, I still don't think you understand this.

She looks nice means "her overall appearance is pleasing." "Hi Julie. You sure look nice today." This could mean Julie has on a pretty dress, got a new haircut, or whatever.
 

proof.beh

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No, I still don't think you understand this.

She looks nice means "her overall appearance is pleasing." "Hi Julie. You sure look nice today." This could mean Julie has on a pretty dress, got a new haircut, or whatever.

That's okay.

Now I got it!

Thank you!
 
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