soccer

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beachboy

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When a soccer team is down 2-0, and manages to come back from behind, does it mean that this team managed to equalize, or even managed to score the third goal?
 

Philly

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Yes, that's the way I would understand it. :)
 

beachboy

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But which alternative: equalized 2-2, or won 3-2? Or either?
 

Philly

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I would tend to think that the team came from behind and won. However, it could simply mean that the team didn't lose -- i.e. it could refer to a 2-2 score.
 

beachboy

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Can you think an expression that implies that the team definetely won the game?
 

Stilo

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came back from behind and won with a resounding 4 - 2 scoreline????

came back from behind, final score 3 - 2.


team xxx came back from behind to go on to win 3 - 2

after a slow/poor start drawing 2-2, xxx raised their game and went on to win 3-2

Is this what you are thinking of beachboy?
Stilo
 
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beachboy

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Yes. My question is, when I say that a team came back from behind after allowing two goals can mean either that the team ended up scoring three goals or that the team only equalized. I also want to know if there is an expression that conveys that the team definitely outscored the other one.
 

BobK

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And if they didn't come from behind, but just won easily, there are quite a few possibilities. In various registers 'trashed', 'p*ssed on ["from a great height is sometimes added for emphasis]', 'thrashed', 'drubbed', 'rubbed their noses in it' [a reference to house-training a cat], 'made short work of' (more likely to be used in a game like tennis which can be shorter/longer), 'gave them a good hiding' (where 'hiding' doesn't refer to concealment but to beating, as a tanner would)...

They might have 'taught them a lesson'. If there was one star, he 'gave them [or "his opposite number"] a masterclass ["in <skill>" - e.g. 'Beckham gave Ferdinand a masterclass in dribbling'].

I don't think 'came from behind' is likely to be used for a drawn match (though I imagine it could be). They just 'levelled the scores' (or in golf 'halved the hole'). More generally - not just sport - 'honours were even'.

Incidentally, losers 'lick their wounds' (even if there's no blood involved - even chess, or a card game).

But I'm beginning to ramble.

b
 
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Stilo

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Just ammended my first reply

Stilo
 

beachboy

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Thanks to all of you. And the last question: is it right to say After allowing three goals in the first half, Flamengo fought back in the second but lost 4-3?
 
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BobK

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:up: Fine.

b
 

vil

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Attention: I'm not a teacher.

Hi beachboy,

Your simple question “Can you think an expression that implies that the team definitely won the game?” has a simple answer: “come up from behind”

come from behind (idiom)

Also, come up from behind. Advance from the rear or from a losing position, as in You can expect the Mets to come from behind before the season is over, or The polls say our candidate is coming up from behind. This idiom, which originated in horse racing, was first transferred to scores in various sports and later to more general use.
Once that has been achieved it is very difficult for a competitor to come from behind .

Goals by Mick Harford and Julian James enabled Luton to come from behind and claim a win that leaves them only three points behind Coventry, the club…

Internazionale had to come from behind to draw with Bari, while Sampdoria beat Verona with a goal by GianLuca Vialli..

Liverpool and Sheffield Wednesday failed to come from behind and overturn first-leg deficits.

Regards.

V.
 

Stilo

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that is fine beachboy
Stilo
 
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