some - a few or unspecific?

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keannu

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I have known "some" refers to either "a few, several" or "unspecific portion of a group that could be 30% or 70% whatever". I usually interprete "some" with the latter, but sometimes some "some" are confusing.
Does this "some" mean the former or the latter? Like "3 to 5 days" or "30 days or 50 days or whatever"?

f2)Labrador is a large area located in the northern part of North America, southwest of Greenland. It has a seacoast over 1,120 kilometers long...Some days in summer are as warm as 34C. In winter, however, Labrador is very cold, and temperatures sometimes fall as low as 45C below...
 
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bhaisahab

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I have know "some" refers to either "a few, several" or "unspecific portion of a group that could be 30% or 70% whatever". I usually interprete "some" with the latter, but sometimes some "some" are confusing.
Does this "some" mean the former or the latter? Like "3 to 5 days" or "30 days or 50 days or whatever"?

f2)Labrador is a large area located in the northern part of North America, southwest of Greenland. It has a seacoast over 1,120 kilometers long...Some days in summer are as warm as 34C. In winter, however, Labrador is very cold, and temperatures sometimes fall as low as 45C below...

It just means "more than one".
 

keannu

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Thanks a lot! Can you tell me in which cases I can interprete "some" as "a few"?
Like in "I brought some cookies to my kids."?
 

emsr2d2

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Thanks a lot! Can you tell me in which cases I can interprete "some" as "a few"?
Like in "I brought some cookies to my kids."?

You can't interpret it as anything in particular. "Some" might mean different things to different people. If you want to say that you brought a few cookies for your kids, then say "a few".
 

keannu

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In Korean English dictionaries, "some" is defined as "a few", giving such a prejudice to Korean learners, but I found nothing like that in English-English dictionaries like Some | Define Some at Dictionary.com.
Now I realize I shouldn't interpret it as "a small number of a few like two or three or four, etc", I have done so, but your advice confirms it.
 

keannu

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Just one last question! I got confused to see this definition in the Korean English dictionary, some ::
I thought "some" can be 10% or 50% or even 90% of something, but this says it's a few, So can't "some of a group" be 90% sometimes?

[NOUN] If you refer to some of the people or things in a group, you mean a few of them but not all of them. If you refer to some of a particular thing, you mean a part of it but not all of it.
 

5jj

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Just one last question! I got confused to see this definition in the Korean English dictionary, some ::
I thought "some" can be 10% or 50% or even 90% of something, but this says it's a few, So can't "some of a group" be 90% sometimes?
'Some of a group' could theoretically be 90%, though we'd be more likely to use 'most' in that case. As others have suggested, you can't get a precise answer -'some' is indefinite.
 
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