Some meanings of the words "carriage" and "coach".

Little man

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Hello. I have another question and think it rather interesting one.
The words "carriage" and "coach".
If we are talking about trains, is there any difference between them? I know that American speakers prefer using the word "car" for it. Also "coach" in American English means the cheapest seats on a plane or train.


And one more question.
If we are talking about vehicle widely used in the past, what is the difference between these two words?
I think "carriage" is more broad term for any wheeled vehicle which carrying persons by horses. "Coach" in my mind, is larger vehicle for the same purpose.
So, I hope you'll help me with it.


Regards.
 

emsr2d2

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On trains, in BrE, they are carriages.

A carriage, in its other sense, is definitely a vehicle pulled by horses. A coach is similar to a bus but for longer journeys (in the UK).
 

SoothingDave

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A carriage would be open, while a coach is closed. Has a roof and place to sit down inside for the passengers.
 

jutfrank

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In Britain, train companies use the word coaches, not carriages.

Passengers tend to use carriage, not coach.
 
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