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jack

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Apr 24, 2004
"Grin > Grinning" <--two "Ns"? why is that? how do you know it is not "grining"?
"Shine > Shining" <--one "N"? why is that? how do you know it is not "shinning"?
 

Francois

Senior Member
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"Grin > Grinning" <--two "Ns"? why is that? how do you know it is not "grining"?
"Shine > Shining" <--one "N"? why is that? how do you know it is not "shinning"?
If the consonant after the first vowel is not doubled, we have an "open vowel" and the mispelled "grining" would be pronounced [gry-ning] (like "fry"), which is not correct. Likewise, the mispelled "shinning" would be pronounced [shea-ning] instead of [shy-ning].

FRC
 

izabela

Junior Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Hi,

There are rules:

When the verb ends with 1 vowel and 1 consonant you double the last letter and then add -ing; grin-grinning. When the verb ends with 'e', you take the 'e' away and add '-ing'; shine-shining.

Iza





jack said:
"Grin > Grinning" <--two "Ns"? why is that? how do you know it is not "grining"?
"Shine > Shining" <--one "N"? why is that? how do you know it is not "shinning"?
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"Travelling" <--incorrect? Why is this incorrect? why doesn't the rule apply to this word?
"Traveling" <--correct?
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
"Travelling" <--incorrect? Why is this incorrect? why doesn't the rule apply to this word?
"Traveling" <--correct?

Dialect difference:

US traveling; elsewhere travelling

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
He is killed.
He is kill. <--incorrect

This is correct. <--why is this correct? Isn't this a "to-be" sentence?
This is corrected. <--correct?
What's the difference in meaning between the two above?

Children. <--correct
Childrens. <--incorrect? why? How do I make it plural?
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
This is correct => this is not wrong.
This is corrected => someone has made a correction, so that it's not wrong anymore.
'Children' is already the plural form of 'child', so you cannot make the pural form of a plural form ;)

FRC
 

Casiopea

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1. He is killed. (Not OK; killed means, no longer in existence, dead, so 'is', meaning, 'existence', doesn't work with 'killed').

2. He is kill. (Not OK; there are two main verbs).

3. He was killed. (OK)
4. He killed someone. (OK)
5. He killed. (OK; idiomatic. It means, he did well)

6. This is correct. (OK; Subject + Verb + Adjective)
7. This is corrected. (Not OK; 'corrected' doesn't work as a nominal participle).

8. This has been corrected. (OK; verbal participle)
9. This was corrected. (OK; verbal participle)

10. Irregular plurals don't take -s:

child (singular), children (plural);
person (singular), people (plural);
sheep (singular), sheep (plural),
foot (singular), feet (plural)
and so on.

All the best, :D
 

Francois

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2004
Are you sure that "it is corrected" is not ok?
This bug will cost us a fortune if it is not corrected.
The defect is corrected in the latest version.
The small bias is corrected using Jalevsky algorithm.

FRC
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Are these correct:

1. Organizing the pictures suck. (this doesn't sound right? Is it suppose to be 'sucks'? Is that the way it is spelled? But the subject is plural?)
2. Organizing the pictures sucks.

3. I hate organizing the pictures, it sucks.
4. I hate organizing the pictures, it suck. ('it' is referring to pictures, so does that mean 'suck' is correct?)
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
Are these correct:

1. Organizing the pictures suck. (this doesn't sound right? Is it suppose to be 'sucks'? Is that the way it is spelled? But the subject is plural?)
2. Organizing the pictures sucks.

Singular Subject + Singular Verb
It sucks.
Organizing sucks.
Organizaing the pictures sucks.

Note that, 'the pictures' functions as the object of the noun/gerund 'Organizing'. The verb 'sucks' agrees in singular number with the gerund 'Organizing'.

Erroneous
Organizing the pictures suck ~ They suck. :( It should be, It sucks. :D

jack said:
3. I hate organizing the pictures, it sucks.
4. I hate organizing the pictures, it suck. ('it' is referring to pictures, so does that mean 'suck' is correct?)

4. is incorrect. Notice the subject "it" is singular in number:

EX: It (organizing the pictures) sucks.
EX: It sucks.
EX: Organizing the pictures sucks.

All the best, :D
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
As I was studying this again, I don't understand why this is incorrect?

1. This is corrected. (Not OK; 'corrected' doesn't work as a nominal participle). I don't understand why this is not right? Doesn't this mean that you're proofreading something and it is corrected now?

2. This was corrected. (OK; verbal participle) Why is this one okay?

Are these correct?
3. It is corrected now. (Saying it has been corrected?)
4. It is correct now. (Saying it is correct?)


1.At its worst, it can be very bad indeed – with persons unknown effectively hijacking your identity to access your existing assets and all the credit they can get from you.
That sentence was taken from here http://finance.sympatico.msn.ca/content/savingsdebt/savingsdebthome/P30111.asp

I don't understand why they didn't use 'people' instead of 'persons'?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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'Persons' is used in certain special contexts, such as the law. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
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Apr 24, 2004
tdol said:
'Persons' is used in certain special contexts, such as the law. ;-)

I still don't really understand this. What difference does it make if they used 'people'? What does 'persons' mean in that sentence?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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Home Country
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In legal language, they often use special forms and this is one example- the police will say that something was stolen by person\persons unknown, because they aren't sure if it was one or more. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Is this incorrect? why?

1. Ironning (Why doesn't it follow this rule 'When the verb ends with 1 vowel and 1 consonant you double the last letter and then add -ing; grin-grinning. When the verb ends with 'e', you take the 'e' away and add '-ing'; shine-shining. '?)
 

Casiopea

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jack said:
1. This is corrected.

FRC added something on that note--specifically, context--so please see his post. :D

At its worst, it can be very bad indeed – with persons unknown effectively hijacking your identity to access your existing assets and all the credit they can get from you.

Source

Use the plural form of person, persons, when you want to make sure that each individual in a group understands that they are individually responsible, as opposed to being responsible as a group. For example, "Persons under the age of 18 will not be served alcohol" means, each person or a person within any given group of peopleunder the age of 18 will not be served.

All the best, :D
 
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