[Grammar] Subject-Verb Concord

emp0608

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Hi folks,

I've come across the following sentence in The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro, the Nobel Prize winner in literature this year: 'The wide, airy nature of the streets here give the city a marvellously spacious feel, so that I found it most easy to spend some hours just strolling in the gently warm sunshine.'

Is it just a careless error we should make no fuss about or is it something he should feel ashamed of? And also, is 'most easy' fine in this case?

Thanks as always,

emp0608
 

GoesStation

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Most easy conveys a different idea than easiest.​ The former means "easy; indeed, extremely easy". The second means "the most easy among any number of options".
 

GoesStation

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Most easy conveys a different idea than easiest.​ The former means "easy; indeed, extremely easy". The second means "the least difficult among any number of options".
I made the serious error of using the term I was explaining in its explanation. See my amended version above.
 

Tdol

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or is it something he should feel ashamed of?

A Nobel Prize winner for literature is imperfect. I'm sure many others have also made mistakes. I doubt that he's losing much sleep over it. I'd leave the shame for something genuinely serious. ;-)
 
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