Suffixes

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hopechest

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A simple question came up during a chat.

I know a "gerund" is, "in English, a form derived from a verb by the addition of the suffix "-ing" that functions as a noun". But are there any other verb forms with special names when you add a suffix, such as "-ism" or "-ly"?

P.S. This is such a useful and helpful forum.
 

RonBee

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I don't think so. For example, ism is generally added to a noun. Examples:
  • capital--capitalism
    social--socialism
    Nazi--Nazism
    cube--cubism

:)
 

hopechest

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RonBee said:
I don't think so. For example, ism is generally added to a noun.
Oopsie. I should have been more general and asked, "Are there special names for any words when you add suffixes or, while we're at it, prefixes?"

^^;;
 

RonBee

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hopechest said:
RonBee said:
I don't think so. For example, ism is generally added to a noun.
Oopsie. I should have been more general and asked, "Are there special names for any words when you add suffixes or, while we're at it, prefixes?"

^^;;

I don't think so, but perhaps someone else knows of such a word.

:)
 

MikeNewYork

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hopechest said:
RonBee said:
I don't think so. For example, ism is generally added to a noun.
Oopsie. I should have been more general and asked, "Are there special names for any words when you add suffixes or, while we're at it, prefixes?"

^^;;

If you are talking about the original word, it is called a root or word word.

prefix + root word = new word
suffix + root word = new word
 

hopechest

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If you are talking about the original word, it is called a root or word word.

prefix + root word = new word
suffix + root word = new word

I'm talking about instances similar to:
verb + ing = noun (gerund)

It's not important, and as far as I know there are no other similar cases, but some friends and I got into an English discussion and this question came up.
 

MikeNewYork

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hopechest said:
If you are talking about the original word, it is called a root or word word.

prefix + root word = new word
suffix + root word = new word

I'm talking about instances similar to:
verb + ing = noun (gerund)

It applies to that. In "buying", the root is "buy" and "ing" is the suffix.
 
Y

yulia

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Could you, please, help me with the identification of the gerund. I often happen to confuse it with the participle. Sometimes I can hardly distinguish the difference between gerund and participle.
Thanks in advance.
 
Y

yulia

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yulia said:
Thank, Cas, hopefully it'll help me. :p

Sorry, my computer seem to have stuck, so I posted my reply at the top.
Anyway, Thanks again. :p

You are most welcome. :D

Why use the "razz" ( :p ) emoticon? :(
 
Y

yulia

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yulia said:
yulia said:
Thank, Cas, hopefully it'll help me. :p

Sorry, my computer seem to have stuck, so I posted my reply at the top.
Anyway, Thanks again. :p

You are most welcome. :D

Why use the "razz" ( :p ) emoticon? :(

What's wrong with this?
Is this better :( ?

Strange, I thought people like smiles.
Ok, I'll mean it.
 

Casiopea

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yulia said:
What's wrong with this :p ?
Is this better :( ?

Strange, I thought people like smiles.
Ok, I'll mean it.

Each emoticon has a meaning. For example,

:D Very Happy
:) Smile
:( Sad
:eek: Surprised
:shock: Shocked
:? Confused
8) Cool
:lol: Laughing
:x Mad
:mad: Very Mad
:p Razz (i.e. joking with you play; playing with you)
:oops: Oops (embarrassed)
:cry: Cry
:evil: Evil
:twisted: Twisted Evil
:roll: Rolling Eyes
:wink: Wink
:!: Exclamation
:?: Question
:idea: Idea
 
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yulia

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Casiopea said:
yulia said:
What's wrong with this :p ?
Is this better :( ?

Strange, I thought people like smiles.
Ok, I'll mean it.

Each emoticon has a meaning. For example,

:D Very Happy
:) Smile
:( Sad
:eek: Surprised
:shock: Shocked
:? Confused
8) Cool
:lol: Laughing
:x Mad
:mad: Very Mad
:p Razz (i.e. joking with you play; playing with you)
:oops: Oops (embarrassed)
:cry: Cry
:evil: Evil
:twisted: Twisted Evil
:roll: Rolling Eyes
:wink: Wink
:!: Exclamation
:?: Question
:idea: Idea

Thanks, Cas, I know that. :D
 

RonBee

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yulia said:
Could you, please, help me with the identification of the gerund. I often happen to confuse it with the participle. Sometimes I can hardly distinguish the difference between gerund and participle.
Thanks in advance.

They are spelled the same, but they are used differently. A gerund is a noun, and a participle is a verb.

:)
 
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