swish and woosh

englishhobby

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Is there any difference in meaning between the verbs 'to swish' and 'to woosh'?
 

emsr2d2

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If you had asked about "swish" and "swoosh", I might have been inclined to say there isn't much difference though context would prompt a more exact answer, as usual.

However, you asked about "woosh" which, to me, is just a noise people make to indicate something moving fast.
 
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Rover_KE

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You'll also see the preferred spelling 'whoosh'.

EDIT: 'swoosh' is also possible—with a similar meaning.
 
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englishhobby

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If you had asked about "swish" and "swoosh", I might have been inclined to say there isn't much difference though context would prompt a more exact answer, as usual.


However, you asked about "woosh" which, to me, is just a noise people make to indicate something moving fast.


But in the dictionary ''whoosh (or woosh)'' is also defined as a verb, and they give an example: ‘a train whooshed by’ (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/whoosh) Is it just a matter of preference for native speakers (to use or not to use ''woosh'' as a verb)?
 
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