take/takes

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Chizu

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Some of my friends 'take' the same course.
i know that "take" is right on that sentence. can someone explain to me why it's "take" but not "take"?
 

RonBee

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Do you mean "Why is it take but not takes"?

The third person plural form is take: they take the same course.

take, took, taken, taking, takes

  • I take the book. We take the book. They take the book. You take the book. Let her take the book. Why should I take the book?
  • I took the book. He took the book. She took it with her. We took it back. They took it somewhere. Who took the book?
  • The book has been taken. It was taken somewhere. You have taken it, haven't you?
  • I am taking it with me. Why are you taking it? What are you taking with you? We are taking her with us. They are taking him with them.
  • He takes it with him every day. It takes a village to raise a child. It takes two to tango. That takes the cake!

:)
 
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Chizu

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what i mean is like:
some of my friends takes that course.
my friend takes that course.
the second sentence uses "takes" because it does not have an "s" after "friend"? if that's true, you don't have to add an "S" if the noun has an "S" at the end?
hmm... i hope you'll understand what im saying.
 

Casiopea

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chizu said:
what i mean is like:
some of my friends takes that course.
my friend takes that course.
the second sentence uses "takes" because it does not have an "s" after "friend"? if that's true, you don't have to add an "S" if the noun has an "S" at the end?
hmm... i hope you'll understand what im saying.

That's not true, per se. What about: I take that course OR People take that course? Both sentences are grammatical and they don't have '-s'.

Here's the REAL rule:

In English a subject and its verb must agree in number. So, if the subject is plural then the verb, too, must be plural, like this,

They take that course.

If the subject is singular, then the verb, too, is singular, like this,

I take that course.

Paradigm
Singular subjects and Singular verb forms
I take
You take
She takes
He takes
It takes

Plural subjects and Plural verb forms
We take
You (people) take
They take

In our example sentences below,

1. Some of my friends take that course.
2. My friend takes that course.

'take' goes with 'friends' because 'friends' is plural (more than one friend). 'takes' goes with 'friend' because 'friend is singular (one friend).

In short,

They take ~ Some of my friends take (plural subject + plural verb)
I take (singular subject + singular verb)
He takes (singular subject + singular verb)

All the best,
 

RonBee

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Some of my friends takes that course.
My friend takes that course.
In the first sentence, friends is third person plural, just like they: they take that course; my friends take that course.

The second sentence uses "takes" because it does not have an "s" after "friend"? If that's true, you don't have to add an "S" if the noun has an "S" at the end?

Cas is right, of course, but as a general rule I think that works. Examples:
  • Dogs take; cats take; bats take; rats take; bands take; stores take; malls take; campers take; recipes take.

That's all I can take. I can't take anymore.

:wink:
 
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Chizu

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what can i ask for more..?thank you both for an excellent explanation!!!
 

RonBee

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