talk about

Status
Not open for further replies.

GUEST2008

Key Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
German
Home Country
Germany
Current Location
Sweden
Hi

Do these sentences below mean the same? I guess they do!

1. I have nothing to talk to/with you about. Can I use either "to" or "with"?
2. I have nothing to talk about with you.
3. There is nothing I can talk about with you.
 

force12winds

New member
Joined
May 3, 2008
Member Type
English Teacher
I think you should use the secon sentence.
But I Understand...
In the usingenglish.com, Do we learning together or we have teachers who will teach our??? :?:
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
Hi

Do these sentences below mean the same? I guess they do!

1. I have nothing to talk to/with you about. Can I use either "to" or "with"?
2. I have nothing to talk about with you.
3. There is nothing I can talk about with you.


Hi GUEST2008,

1. and 2. Mean the same, you can use "to" or "with" though they can mean slightly different things. Talking to someone could indicate a one sided conversation, whereas, Talking with someone implies more of a two way discussion.

3. Means that there is no subject on which we can converse, whereas,1 and 2 mean that at the moment there is nothing we need to say to each other.

Although, both sound a bit negative and confrontational to me.:)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Hi

Do these sentences below mean the same? I guess they do!

1. I have nothing to talk to/with you about. Can I use either "to" or "with"?
2. I have nothing to talk about with you.
3. There is nothing I can talk about with you.
Sentences one and two mean the same.
:)
 

GUEST2008

Key Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
German
Home Country
Germany
Current Location
Sweden
Hi GUEST2008,

1. and 2. Mean the same, you can use "to" or "with" though they can mean slightly different things. Talking to someone could indicate a one sided conversation, whereas, Talking with someone implies more of a two way discussion.

Hi

I think in most cases conversations are two sided, and very rarely one sided. Maybe, that's why should say: "with" instead of "to"? :cool:
 

banderas

Key Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
Polish
Home Country
Poland
Current Location
UK
Hi

I think in most cases conversations are two sided, and very rarely one sided. Maybe, that's why should say: "with" instead of "to"? :cool:

That is true unless you have a boss who wants to tell you off and then the conversation is one sided. He talks and talks and you hardly say a word. ;-)
He talks to you, not with you.
 

GUEST2008

Key Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
German
Home Country
Germany
Current Location
Sweden
That is true unless you have a boss who wants to tell you off and then the conversation is one sided. He talks and talks and you hardly say a word. ;-)
He talks to you, not with you.

Right ;-)
 

GUEST2008

Key Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
German
Home Country
Germany
Current Location
Sweden
However, when I call someone it's better to say (when somebody answers): I'd like to talk with John/Mike/Anne etc. rather than I'd like to talk to.....
When I call someone I usually want to have a conversation with someone, unless I just want to inform another person about something and hang up.
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
However, when I call someone it's better to say (when somebody answers): I'd like to talk with John/Mike/Anne etc. rather than I'd like to talk to.....
It's pretty much a matter of personal preference which is used.
When I call someone I usually want to have a conversation with someone, unless I just want to tell somebody something and hang up.
:)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Hi

What was wrong with the word "inform"?
Nothing is wrong with it. It is just a good thing (in my opinion) to know that inform is not informal (conversational) English. Most people are more likely to say "I told him" rather than "I informed him".
:)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top