teacher to?

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abrilsp

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Hi :)

I think that to say I teach Spanish to adults is correct. But what about I am a Spanish teacher to adults or I am a Spanish teacher for adults.

Do we use to or for

And what about this other one:
I have been in few workshops regarding this matter
It is possible to say:
I have been in a few workshops regarding this matter


Thanks a lot

abrilsp[/b]
 

Casiopea

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I teach Spanish to adults. OK
Ditransitive Verb:
teach something to someone (DO + IO)
teach someone something (IO + DO)

I am a Spanish teacher to adults ~ for adults not OK
Linking Verb:
be + adjective or noun (*to and *for head prepositional phrases)


I have been in a few workshops regarding this matter. OK
('a few' means, some but not many. 'some' = positive: That is, I have been to at least a few workshops, whereas Sam has been to none.)

I have been in few workshops regarding this matter OK
('few' means, not many. Lack of 'a' = negative: That is, out of the 10 workshops I have been to, few gave out free books.)

:D
 
A

abrilsp

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Hi :)
Thanks a lot for your help, but know I have another query:

teach someone something (IO + DO)

So, I teach adults English , is it correct?

Thanks,
abrilsp
 
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abrilsp

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Hi :)

I am a Spanish teacher to adults ~ for adults not OK
Linking Verb:
be + adjective or noun (*to and *for head prepositional phrases)

So how does it work then?

I am a Spanish teacher of adults

Thanks
 

Tdol

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I am a Spanish teacher of adults

That probably means the nationality not the subject. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
I am a Spanish teacher of adults

That probably means the nationality not the subject. ;-)

Isn't "I am a teacher of adults" okay? What about "I am an ESL teacher of adults"? Then there is "I am an English teacher of adults", which means the person teaches English to adults. I do not think under the context that English identifies the person's nationality. Instead, it identifies the subject that person teaches.

What do you think?

:)
 

Tdol

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I teach Spanish to adults\I teach adults Spanish would both be clearer, IMO. ;-)
 

RonBee

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tdol said:
I teach Spanish to adults\I teach adults Spanish would both be clearer, IMO. ;-)

That might be true, but surely (in the sentence in question) of is an improvement over to or for? (It was my suggestion.)

:wink:
 

Tdol

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To and For don't work in that context at all, IMO. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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tdol said:
I am a Spanish teacher of adults. That probably means the nationality not the subject. ;-)

RonBee said:
Isn't "I am a teacher of adults" okay? What about "I am an ESL teacher of adults"? Then there is "I am an English teacher of adults", which means the person teaches English to adults. I do not think under the context that English identifies the person's nationality. Instead, it identifies the subject that person teaches. What do you think?

It's the old

"She's a Spanish, English teacher." (She's Spanish and teaches English)
"She's a British, Spanish teacher." (She's British and teaches Spanish)

I'm an American, Spanish teacher of adults = I'm an American, adults' Spanish teacher. (Spanish = subject)

:D
 

Tdol

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But not 'She's a Spanish British teacher'. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Casiopea said:
tdol said:
I am a Spanish teacher of adults. That probably means the nationality not the subject. ;-)

RonBee said:
Isn't "I am a teacher of adults" okay? What about "I am an ESL teacher of adults"? Then there is "I am an English teacher of adults", which means the person teaches English to adults. I do not think under the context that English identifies the person's nationality. Instead, it identifies the subject that person teaches. What do you think?

It's the old

"She's a Spanish, English teacher." (She's Spanish and teaches English)
"She's a British, Spanish teacher." (She's British and teaches Spanish)

I'm an American, Spanish teacher of adults = I'm an American, adults' Spanish teacher. (Spanish = subject)

:D

My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:

English Idioms
https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1697

Brief Verse (Couplets)
https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1579

:D
 

Casiopea

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  • My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:

You mean, she was a Hamburger? :wink: :wink:
 

Tdol

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Casiopea said:
tdol said:
But not 'She's a Spanish British teacher'. ;-)

Hmm. Why not?

She's a Spanish, British Literature teacher. :wink: :wink:

That's cheating- you can study British Literature, but I've never seen a course in 'British'. ;-)
 

RonBee

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Casiopea said:
  • My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:

You mean, she was a Hamburger? :wink: :wink:

Yes, possibly.

:wink:
 
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