teenage vs teenager

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Abstract Idea

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What is the difference, regarding usage, between the words teenage and teenager ? Is it correct to say that teenage is always an adjective while teenager is always a noun? What about the variant teenaged is it also extensively used?
 

sarat_106

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What is the difference, regarding usage, between the words teenage and teenager ? Is it correct to say that teenage is always an adjective while teenager is always a noun? What about the variant teenaged is it also extensively used?

The period between childhood to adulthood is known as teenage characterized by adolescence which is a transitional stage of physical and mental human development that occurs between childhood and adulthood. This transition involves biological, social, and psychological changes. This is the teenage years from ages 13 to 19.(thirteen to nineteen)

Teen is a noun and used as a suffix to form cardinal numerals from 13 to 19 (thirteenth century, a sixteen year old boy). Teenage is formed from –teen as a separate word +age; resulting in derived noun teenager which is always used as noun to mean a person between the age 13 to 19 years. Teenaged is also an adjective but teenage finds more common use. Such as:
teenage romance, teenage crime, teenage pregnancy, teenage girl,
 

Ann1977

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What is the difference, regarding usage, between the words teenage and teenager ? Is it correct to say that teenage is always an adjective while teenager is always a noun? What about the variant teenaged is it also extensively used?


I think "teenage" would always be an adjective, and "teenager" would always be a noun.

The use of "teenaged" is disappearing, it seems to me. Apparently a lot of adjectives like this are falling out of use. I see "ice tea" now where I would have expected "iced tea," for example.
 

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So, are there situations in which both words can be used interchangeably? For example:

Her daughter is a teenage.
Her daughter is a teenager.
Her daughter is a teenage girl.
Her daughter is a teenager girl.


Which of the above sentences are correct/incorrect/common/uncommon ?
And what about the example below, teenage or teenager or both should/could be used?

And you, are you married?
Oh, no Sir, I am still a teenage(r).

Please note that I am concerned about the final 's' in the word teenager.
 

bhaisahab

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So, are there situations in which both words can be used interchangeably? For example:

Her daughter is a teenage.
Her daughter is a teenager.
Her daughter is a teenage girl.
Her daughter is a teenager girl.


Which of the above sentences are correct/incorrect/common/uncommon ?
And what about the example below, teenage or teenager or both should/could be used?

And you, are you married?
Oh, no Sir, I am still a teenage(r).

Please note that I am concerned about the final 's' in the word teenager.

Her daughter is a teenage.:cross:
Her daughter is a teenager.:tick:
Her daughter is a teenage girl. :tick:
Her daughter is a teenager girl.
:cross:
 

outofdejavu

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ymnisky:
> Her daughter is a teenage girl.


Although bhaisahab okayed this sentence, I find it tautological. :shock:


Cheers,
 

bhaisahab

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ymnisky:
> Her daughter is a teenage girl.


Although bhaisahab okayed this sentence, I find it tautological. :shock:


Cheers,

Yes, I thought that at first, but for example, my wife's grandmother is 98 her daughter is a 78 year old divorced woman with two children. Her daughter is not a teenage girl.
 

Abstract Idea

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ymnisky:
> Her daughter is a teenage girl.


Although bhaisahab okayed this sentence, I find it tautological. :shock:


Cheers,

Okay, although personally I am a fond of tautological expressions, to reinforce clarity, you maybe right. So let us change it to:

- Her children are a teenage girl and a teenage boy.
- Her children are a teenager girl and a teenager boy.
- Her children are two teenagers, a boy and a girl.
- Her children are two teenages, a boy and a girl.

- Usually I teach English to teenages.
- Usually I teach English to teenagers.
- Usually I teach teenages.
- Usually I teach teenagers.
- Usually I teach teenager students.
- Usually I teach teenage students.
- Usually I teach teenage English!
- Usually I teach teenager English.

- Their teacher is still a teenager.
- Their teacher is still a teenage.
- Their teacher is still a teenager one.
- Their teacher is still a teenage one.

The idea I am using to construct such examples is to be sure that teenager is always a noun while teenage is always an adjective. I am still not sure about that. Would you tick above please?

Back to the tautology outofdejavu, would you be happier if I said:
- Her daughter is a teenage one?
What is your suggestion, besides the trivial Her daughter is a teenager ?

 

outofdejavu

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Here is my take:

- Her children are a teenage girl and a teenage boy.:tick:
- Her children are a teenager girl and a teenager boy.
- Her children are two teenagers, a boy and a girl.:tick:
- Her children are two teenages, a boy and a girl.


- Usually I teach English to teenages.
- Usually I teach English to teenagers.:tick:
- Usually I teach teenages.
- Usually I teach teenagers.:tick:
- Usually I teach teenager students.
- Usually I teach teenage students.:tick:
- Usually I teach teenage English!

This reads like you teach a subject called "teenage English."
In my country, there are English-language teaching (ELT) categories such as "children English" and "adult English." Perhaps somewhere in this world "teenage English" exists as an ELT category.
:shock:

- Usually I teach teenager English.

Pluralize "teenager" or add an article before "teenager" (which depends on context), and then this sentence would be fine.


- Their teacher is still a teenager.:tick:
- Their teacher is still a teenage.
- Their teacher is still a teenager one.
- Their teacher is still a teenage one.

[...]Would you tick above please?

As requested.

Back to the tautology outofdejavu, would you be happier if I said:
- Her daughter is a teenage one?
With context supporting that "her daughter" is between the ages of 13 and 19, "her daughter is a teenager" would suffice.

What I did not say in my earlier reply is that "daughter" already implies gender.

What is your suggestion, besides the trivial Her daughter is a teenager ?
If "her daughter" isn't a dropout, you might say something like "her daughter is a middle school student" (This implies that she is aged between 13 and 14) or "her daughter is a high school student" (This implies that she is aged between 14 and 18).



Cheers,
:fadein:
 
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Here is my take:



As requested.

With context supporting that "her daughter" is between the ages of 13 and 19, "her daughter is a teenager" would suffice.

What I did not say in my earlier reply is that "daughter" already implies gender.

If "her daughter" isn't a dropout, you might say something like "her daughter is a middle school student" (This implies that she is aged between 13 and 14) or "her daughter is a high school student" (This implies that she is aged between 14 and 18).



Cheers,
:fadein:


Okay outofdejavu, thank you very much for your contribution. I understand (and kind of agree) with your argument on the tautology, but that is not the main point I am concerned about, rather the teenage/teenager usage.
I'll keep thinking about it. Any other opinions on the subject are welcome.
 
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