[Vocabulary] tell about it.

englishhobby

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In my language we can say "Tell about it" without using an indirect object. I know that in English we can't. So how can I improve the following sentence so that it sounded correct?

Choose a topic that is pleasant for you and tell about it. (There is a number of topics to choose from.)

(If I use talk about it or speak about it, it may mean only one-way speaking, no one may be listening.)
 

bhaisahab

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'talk about it'
 

Skrej

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You might hear this construction of 'tell about' in AmE sometimes as a kind of imperative. It might be nonstandard, though.

"Tell about that time you went skinny-dipping in the blizzard."

In your original example, I'd probably say "tell us/the class/your audience about it'.

If it's a writing assignment and there's no actual speaking involved, then you could say 'write about it'.

Other possibilities include 'describe it', discuss it', 'elaborate about/on it', and numerous other verbs.
 

andrewg927

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"Tell about that time you went skinny-dipping in the blizzard."

Perhaps some regional dialects might accept this but I find it much better with "tell me" or "tell us".
 

Phaedrus

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Other possibilities:
Choose a topic that is pleasant for you and say something about it.
Choose a topic that is pleasant for you and say some things about it.

 

Skrej

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There's probably a better way to tweak the Ngram, but these results (combined BrE and AmE) show it as fairly common compared to similar phrases including an object. The construction does appear to be more than twice as common in AmE than in BrE.

Perhaps somebody more adept at using Ngram search variables can improve it or interpret it better.
 
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