Tense

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Håkon

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Hi!

I just had an English test, in which my teacher corrected something that I don't completely agree with him in being a mistake.

I had written "The younger generation rejected their parents' music, considering it daft and outdated."

He corrected me for writing in both the present and the past tense. And as I doubted him somewhat in this matter, I got more or less obsessed with this whole past and present tense affair.

Can you please tell me whether I made a mistake or not, and why, so that I can teach my teacher some propper English?

In advance, thank you! =)
-Håkon, Norway
 

David L.

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"In the fifties, young people were delinquents. The younger generation rejected their parents' music, considering it daft and outdated. This may seem hard to comprehend today, with all generations united in their love of heavy metal and rap."
Otherwise, if you are talking about the younger generation of today, then it would be:
"The younger generation reject their parents' music (from the 50's and 60's, which they (parents) still play and listen to on their steam gramophones), considering it daft and outdated."

Where does that leave you?

((Two very angry young men in the forum today, both angry with their teachers!!))
 

light

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the part starting with considering... isn't it a participle clause? so nothing wrong I guess whether the main clause is in present or past.
 

heidita

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Was the rest of the text written in present tense? Probably that's the mistake. I agree with David, there is nothing wrong with your sentence.
 

Håkon

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I just wondered whether I could write "The younger generation (of the 50's and 60's) rejected their parents' music, considering it daft and outdated." or not.
The mix of tenses there got my teacher quite confused or something. I didn't really understand what he ment, cause I have been writing like that all my English-writing life without any comment.
Sometimes I wonder who is the teacher... Me, or my teacher...
 

heidita

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In your sentence there actually IS no mix of tenses. You are writing in the past and ...considering .....is a clause which really has no specific tense, so it could be used in present as well as in the past. I have no idea what your teacher meant.

Have a look at this thread:

Present Participle Clauses (word order)
 

cutey geegee

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hi everybody ! :)

hope that my comment will be useful..

but before passing the comment, I would like to assure that I am a demonstartor ( teacher ) of Englih Language at a college, which means that my comment is based upon authentic grammar books, such as Understanding and Using English Grammar, by Betty Azar.

the sentence that you wrote, dear friend, is grammatically correct since you have used the word ( considering ) as a gerund. The gerund is the (-ing) form of a verb, functioning as a noun. Which means that the gerund can be used with any tense, since it functions as a noun.

I hope that my participation will answer your question.

I'll be glad to receive any comments.

wish you the best of luck.
:-D
 

CHOMAT

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There is nothing wrong with tenses. However V-ing heading a clause is often used for particular events and preterite is preferred for general situations no matter the tense:
In your example,The young generation refers to a general phenomenon:

general: I walked a great deal, and thought about the coming year:

specific : I walked down the street, thinking about the future.
 

naomimalan

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hi everybody ! :)

hope that my comment will be useful..

but before passing the comment, I would like to assure that I am a demonstartor ( teacher ) of Englih Language at a college, which means that my comment is based upon authentic grammar books, such as Understanding and Using English Grammar, by Betty Azar.

the sentence that you wrote, dear friend, is grammatically correct since you have used the word ( considering ) as a gerund. The gerund is the (-ing) form of a verb, functioning as a noun. Which means that the gerund can be used with any tense, since it functions as a noun.

I hope that my participation will answer your question.

I'll be glad to receive any comments.

wish you the best of luck.
:-D

Actually in this case the word "considering" is not a gerund, Cutey Geegee:shock:, but a present participle. -ing forms are not necessarily gerunds. A quick way to determine whether an -ing form in a sentence is a gerund or not is to try and replace it by a noun or pronoun. If you can, it's a gerund, if you can't it's a present participle.
For example, in the following sentence:
I hate doing the ironing
you can replace doing the ironing by a pronoun: I hate that. So it's a gerund.

In"The younger generation rejected their parents' music, considering it daft and outdated."

you can’t replace considering by a noun or pronoun. So it’s a present participle.
 

cutey geegee

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heeeeeey there.

you are absolutely right ! it is present participle.

I totally forgot to do the replacing thing !

forgive me, guys !

many thanks for passing your comments.

have a nice day ;-)
 

CHOMAT

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There is nothing wrong with tenses. However present parti heading a clause is often used for particular events and preterite is preferred for general situations no matter the tense:
In your example,The young generation refers to a general phenomenon.

general: I walked a great deal, and thought about the coming year:

specific : I walked down the street, thinking about the future.

That might be the reason why your teacher corrected you.
 

heidita

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the part starting with considering... isn't it a participle clause? so nothing wrong I guess whether the main clause is in present or past.

guess I'm invisible or what..

Not necessarily something terrible, mind you!!:lol:

I saw you, no doubt!;-) I think we all agree, nothing wrong with his sentence.
 

naomimalan

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guess I'm invisible or what..

So sorry Light! With a lovely name like yours, how could you be invisible? And yet, I must have overlooked your contribution when answering the other post about gerunds. Of course your comment was 100% correct!

Am clicking on the "thanks" box below your first post.:oops::oops:
 

CHOMAT

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Not necessarily something terrible, mind you!!:lol:

I saw you, no doubt!;-) I think we all agree, nothing wrong with his sentence.
I would add a nuance to the all agree thing
 
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