than + bare infinitive

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yun

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I can find many examples in which bare infinitive is followed by than.
Are they grammatically correct?
If so, please explain to me why bare infinitive is used.
Thank you.

NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.
The Soviet regime did much more than simply occupy territories.
Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies.
 

LeUyenHoc

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I can find many examples in which bare infinitive is followed by than.
Are they grammatically correct?
If so, please explain to me why bare infinitive is used.
Thank you.

NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.
The Soviet regime did much more than simply occupy territories.
Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies.

In my opinion, "than" plays as an adverb in such cases:-D
 

Pedroski

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The Soviet regime did much more than simply occupy territories.

Derive this one from:

The SR did occupy territories.
The SR did simply occupy territories.
The SR did simply occupy territories.
The SR did more than simply occupy territories.
The SR did much more than simplyoccupy territories.

This one the same.
Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies.


Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies
Food does fill our bellies.
Food does simply fill our bellies.
Food does more than simply fill our bellies.

The other one I'll have to think about. I'll get back to you!
Food does much more than simply fill our bellies.



 

yun

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Dear Pedroski,

Thank you very much for your reply.
A Canadian on another ESL site answered me that bare infinitive can be used after than.
"The SR did much more than simply (to) occupy territories."
However, I can't find such a rule in grammar books that "to" can be left out after "than"
 

ptetpe

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Try this,

All NPR did was (to) repurpose its own material for podcasts.

NPR has done much more than (All NPR did was (to) )simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.

NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.


The bare infinitive is found characteristically in pseudo-cleft sentences, where the infinitival to is optional:
What they did was (to) dig a shallow channel around the tent.
 

albertino

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I can find many examples in which bare infinitive is followed by than.
Are they grammatically correct?
If so, please explain to me why bare infinitive is used.
Thank you.

NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.
The Soviet regime did much more than simply occupy territories.
Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies.

(Not a teacher)
Let me solve the riddle for you, yun.

In addition to what you said that "than" may be used as an adjective or adverb, it can also be a "PREPOSITION". If such is the case, then a "GERUND" normally follows, BUT not "Except, besides, save, but and than" After them, we normally use a "to-infinitive" or "bare infinitive" depending on whether there is a "do" verb, including its variants, preceding the prepositions. If yes, we use bare infinitive. If not, we use "to-infinitive" instead. Quoting your examples, we will find:

NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.
The Soviet regime did much more than simply occupy territories.
Food does so much more than simply fill our bellies.

That is the trick. I hope this can help.;-)
 

Pedroski

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Your question was: why is the verb in the prepositional phrase beginning with 'than' a bare infinitive.

It is so because it has no overt subject. There is no information telling the verb in which person it should inflect. Also there is nothing to indicate in which time this takes place. Past present or future. If there were it would be a a clause and not a phrase, and than would be a conjunction joining two clauses.

than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts. This prepositional phrase is a complement to the object of the sentence, 'NPR has done much more than simply repurpose its own material for podcasts.', which is 'more'. More is the object of the sentence.

The Soviet regime did much more (than simply occupy territories.)

Food does so much more (than simply fill our bellies.)
The PP is very useful. It has no tense. That means that it (the PP prepositional phrase) can be used with any tense.
Food did so much more (than simply fill our bellies.) Past
Food does so much more (than simply fill our bellies.) Present
Food will do so much more (than simply fill our bellies.) Future

Than is not an adjective. Neither is it an adverb.
 

ptetpe

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The PP is very useful. It has no tense. That means that it (the PP prepositional phrase) can be used with any tense.
Could you give me another example that preposition can be followed by bare form of the verb?
 
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