The children have played for two hours, and they are having snacks and juice now.

Alice Chu

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2019
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Taiwan
Current Location
Taiwan
“Have played” and “played” in the sentences below refer to an action which lasted for two hours and was finished before now.

Are there any other differences between them?



1. The children have played for two hours, and they are having snacks and juice now.

2. The children played for two hours, and they are having snacks and juice now.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
The first links the play more closely to the snacks and juice for me- they need some nutrition. Others may see things differently.
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
1. The children have played for two hours, and they are having snacks and juice now.

2. The children played for two hours, and they are having snacks and juice now.
I see it as the normal difference between the present perfect and the past simple.

1. The present relevance of the past playing to the present consumption of refreshment is suggested.
2. The simple sequence of the past playing and the present consumption of refreshment is suggested.
 
Top