the comparative

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the more you study, the more you know. I would like to know the rules for this structure,please can anybody help me?
thanks a lot :roll:
 

MikeNewYork

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carla guaraldi said:
the more you study, the more you know. I would like to know the rules for this structure,please can anybody help me?
thanks a lot :roll:

I'm not sure what you're asking. Your example is stated correctly. The second part is a consequence of the first part.
 

Tdol

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When two things are compared and one depends on the other, we use a comparative with 'the'. The more you eat, the fatter you'll get. :lol:
 
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Susie Smith

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tdol said:
When two things are compared and one depends on the other, we use a comparative with 'the'. The more you eat, the fatter you'll get. :lol:

Here's the rule:

Use the + comparative form of the adjective + the + comparative form of the adjetive to show a cause-and-effect relationship.

The more crowded the restaurant, the slower the service.

The riper the peach, the better it tastes.

The more I see her, the less I like her.

:)
 
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do you use adverbs in this structure?
thanks for your help.
 
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Susie Smith

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carla guaraldi said:
do you use adverbs in this structure?
thanks for your help.

So sorry! I was in a hurry and didn't do a thorough job. (The older I get, the more forgetful I become.) :wink:

You most certainly can use adverbs this way, too.

Use the + comparative form of the adverb + the + comparative form of the adverb to show a cause-and-effect relationship.

The harder he played, the better he performed.

The harder he tries, the better he does.

The faster I walk, the more tired I get.

:) :)
 
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thanks very much you really helped me.
 

RonBee

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Susie Smith, you explained that wonderfully well.

Excellent!

:D :D
 
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